Summary: BBC's Microsoft Bias

Summary of the BBC's blatant Microsoft bias and anti-Linux bigotry:

  • BBC blatantly lies about Windows Phone 7 "dominating" the smartphone market, even though it only has a 1.9% market share, compared to Symbian's 11.7% market share, which the BBC inexplicably claims must mean it's "not long for this world"
  • BBC Censoring Open Source: BBC education reporter, Judith Burns, removes the phrase "open source" from education secretary's speech
  • BBC sneers at Linux: BBC Click reporter, Microsoft evangelist and anti-Linux bigot, Spencer Kelly, refuses to name the Linux OS powering a new device at CES 2012, then sneers: "As you can see the operating system has been written especially for this tablet, because that's what I think the world needs, is yet another tablet operating system. But seriously... "

BBC Censoring Open Source

Why did the BBC just censor the phrase "open source" from the following article?

(Significant differences highlighted in red)

Take 1:

When Microsoft Attacks

Slated employs many different techniques to protect the site from hacking, but by far the most important is vigilance, and that means paying close attention to things like logs.

Like many sites, Slated is under constant attack, mostly from bots running on compromised Windows machines, but most of those attacks are purely opportunistic and random, or in other words aren't actually targeting Slated for any particular reason. But every now and then I discover something in the server logs that suggests otherwise.

Today was one of those days.