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Some Of Hacker Group's Claim Of Having Access To 250M iCloud Account Aren't False

Slashdot - 46 min 39 sec ago
Earlier this week, a hacker group claimed that it had access to 250 million iCloud accounts. The hackers, who called themselves part of Turkish Crime Family group, threatened to reset passwords of all the iCloud accounts and remotely wipe those iPhones. Apple could stop them, they said, if it paid them a ransom by April 7. In a statement, Apple said, "the alleged list of email addresses and passwords appears to have been obtained from previously compromised third-party services," and that it is working with law enforcement officials to identify the hackers. Now, ZDNet reports that it obtained a set of credentials from the hacker group and was able to verify some of the claims. From the article: ZDNet obtained a set of 54 credentials from the hacker group for verification. All the 54 accounts were valid, based on a check using the site's password reset function. These accounts include "icloud.com," dating back to 2011, and legacy "me.com" and "mac.com" domains from as early as 2000. The list of credentials contained just email addresses and plain-text passwords, separated by a colon, which according to Troy Hunt, data breach expert and owner of notification site Have I Been Pwned, makes it likely that the data "could be aggregated from various sources." We started working to contact each person, one by one, to confirm their password. Most of the accounts are no longer registered with iMessage and could not be immediately reached. However, 10 people in total confirmed that their passwords were accurate, and as a result have now been changed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Oz companies fume as Enetica outage enters its second day

El Reg - 48 min 51 sec ago
Hosting service's access to .au registry suspended

Australian web service firm Enetica has provoked consternation among customers frustrated about a prolonged outage now entering its second day.…

Amazon Wins $1.5 Billion Tax Dispute Over IRS

Slashdot - 1 hour 26 min ago
Amazon.com on Thursday won a more than $1.5 billion tax dispute with the Internal Revenue Service over transactions involving a Luxembourg unit more than a decade ago. From a report: Judge Albert Lauber of the U.S. Tax Court rejected a variety of IRS arguments, and found that on several occasions the agency abused its discretion, or acted arbitrarily or capriciously. Amazon's ultimate tax liability from the decision was not immediately clear. The world's largest online retailer has said the case involved transactions in 2005 and 2006, and could boost its federal tax bill by $1.5 billion plus interest. It also said a loss could add "significant" tax liabilities in later years. Amazon made just $2.37 billion of profit in 2016, four times what it made in the four prior years combined, on revenue of $136 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

UK.gov confirms it won't be buying V-22 Ospreys for new aircraft carriers

El Reg - 1 hour 55 min ago
Also confirms earlier operational date for HMS Queen Elizabeth

Britain is not buying V-22 Osprey aircraft to fly from its new aircraft carriers, the government has confirmed.…

RADV vs. NVIDIA Vulkan/OpenGL Performance For Serious Sam 2017

Phoronix - 1 hour 57 min ago
Yesterday I published some initial RADV Vulkan benchmarks for Serious Sam 2017, their "fusion" update to Serious Sam HD: The First Encounter. In this article are some comparison NVIDIA Linux Vulkan benchmark figures.

Hollywood Producer Blames Rotten Tomatoes For Convincing People Not To See His Movie

Slashdot - 2 hours 6 min ago
An anonymous reader shares a VanityFair report: These days, it takes less than 60 seconds to know what the general consensus on a new movie is -- thanks to Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregator site that designates a number score to each film based on critical and user reviews. Although this may be convenient for moviegoers not necessarily interested in burning $15 on a critically subpar film, it is certainly not convenient for those Hollywood directors, producers, backers, and stars who toiled to make said critically subpar film. In fact, the site may be "the worst thing that we have in today's movie culture" -- at least according to Brett Ratner, the Rush Hour director/producer who recently threw the financial weight of his RatPac Entertainment behind Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Sure, the blockbuster made over $850 million worldwide in spite of negative reviews ... but just think of how much more it could have made had it not had a Rotten Tomatoes score of 27 percent! Last week, while speaking at the Sun Valley Film Festival, Ratner said, "The worst thing that we have in today's movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. I think it's the destruction of our business."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google pulls Hezbollah YouTube channel after we told them about the drone ads

El Reg - 2 hours 46 min ago
All the tools you need

Until just minutes before we hit publish on this story, Google was using a YouTube channel run by a fan of Hezbollah to promote potentially lethal drones.…

OpenSSL Planning To Relicense Its Code

Phoronix - 3 hours 5 min ago
The OpenSSL project is planning to change its software license...

Sea Ice Extent Sinks To Record Lows At Both Poles

Slashdot - 3 hours 6 min ago
According to NASA, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached on March 7 a record low wintertime maximum extent. On the opposite side of the planet, Antartica ice hit its lowest extent ever recorded by satellites (since satellites began measuring sea ice in 1979) on March 3 at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere. Science Daily reports: Total polar sea ice covered 6.26 million square miles (16.21 million square kilometers), which is 790,000 square miles (2 million square kilometers) less than the average global minimum extent for 1981-2010 -- the equivalent of having lost a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico. The ice floating on top of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas shrinks in a seasonal cycle from mid-March until mid-September. As the Arctic temperatures drop in the autumn and winter, the ice cover grows again until it reaches its yearly maximum extent, typically in March. The ring of sea ice around the Antarctic continent behaves in a similar manner, with the calendar flipped: it usually reaches its maximum in September and its minimum in February. This winter, a combination of warmer-than-average temperatures, winds unfavorable to ice expansion, and a series of storms halted sea ice growth in the Arctic. This year's maximum extent, reached on March 7 at 5.57 million square miles (14.42 million square kilometers), is 37,000 square miles (97,00 square kilometers) below the previous record low, which occurred in 2015, and 471,000 square miles (1.22 million square kilometers) smaller than the average maximum extent for 1981-2010.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Profitless Twitter starts rumour of paid-for Tweetdeck option

El Reg - 3 hours 25 min ago
Gotta do something to break even, right?

Twitter, the profitless microblogging website, has floated the idea of offering a paid-for version of its Tweetdeck product – and this is going down amongst the site’s users like a cup of lukewarm vomit.…

There's just a week to show us how AI really works in business

El Reg - 3 hours 28 min ago
M3 call for papers has a week to run

Events  There are just seven days left until we close the call for papers for M3, and we would really love to hear how you’re putting artificial intelligence, machine learning and predictive analytics to work in business.…

I've Been Moved: IBMers in same division slapped with 2nd redundo scheme in 2 months

El Reg - 4 hours 1 min ago
Deathly Hallows Mark ii

IBM UK appears to have fired the starting gun on a 2.0 redundancy programme for the Infrastructure Services Delivery division – before the first one has even concluded.…

More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published

Phoronix - 4 hours 33 min ago
Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today...

Ofcom wants automatic compensation for the people when ISPs fail

El Reg - 4 hours 41 min ago
Watchdog proposes fines for every day repairs, installations and appointments are missed

Ofcom has begun consulting on the government's desire to compensate consumers and SMEs when telco companies fail, as set out in the Digital Economy Bill, even though the Bill hasn't reached the Royal Assent stage yet.…

Did you know: Crimelords behind DDoS attacks offer customer loyalty points?

El Reg - 5 hours 15 min ago
Tweaking business models for greater 404 kerching

The DDoS attack business has advanced to the point that running an attack can cost as little as $7 an hour, while the targeted company can end up losing thousands, if not millions of dollars.…

Coreboot Picks Up A New Kabylake Chromebook "Fizz"

Phoronix - 5 hours 38 min ago
It may not be as exciting as hearing Dell looking at Coreboot, but another Intel-powered Chromebook is now supported by mainline Coreboot...

ELKDAT Tool Released To Ease Linux Kernel Development & Testing

Phoronix - 5 hours 50 min ago
ELKDAT is a new Linux kernel project to provide an easy kernel development and testing tool...

GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed

Phoronix - 6 hours 16 sec ago
Gtef is short for the GTK+ Text Editor Framework and makes it easier to develop text editors and IDEs with GNOME's toolkit...

Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

El Reg - 6 hours 5 min ago
Ever so lone lone lone lone a-lonely

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  “For heaven’s sake, stop waggling it in my face! Kuh-rist, keep still! Right – you’ve asked for it!”…

Molecule Kills Elderly Cells, Reduces Signs of Aging In Mice

Slashdot - 6 hours 6 min ago
An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from a Science Magazine report: Even if you aren't elderly, your body is home to agents of senility -- frail and damaged cells that age us and promote disease. Now, researchers have developed a molecule that selectively destroys these so-called senescent cells. The compound makes old mice act and appear more youthful, providing hope that it may do the same for us. As we get older, senescent cells build up in our tissues, where researchers think they contribute to illnesses such as heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. In the past, scientists have genetically modified mice to dispatch their senescent cells, allowing the rodents to live longer and reducing plaque buildup in their arteries. Such genetic alterations aren't practical for people, but researchers have reported at least seven compounds, known as senolytics, that kill senescent cells. A clinical trial is testing two of the drugs in patients with kidney disease, and other trials are in the works. However, current senolytic compounds, many of which are cancer drugs, come with downsides. They can kill healthy cells or trigger side effects such as a drop in the number of platelets, the cellular chunks that help our blood clot. Cell biologist Peter de Keizer of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues were investigating how senescent cells stay alive when they uncovered a different strategy for attacking them. Senescent cells carry the type of DNA damage that should spur a protective protein, called p53, to put them down. Instead, the researchers found that a different protein, FOXO4, latches onto p53 and prevents it from doing its duty. To counteract this effect, De Keizer and colleagues designed a molecule, known as a peptide, that carries a shortened version of the segment of FOXO4 that attaches to p53. In a petri dish, this peptide prevented FOXO4 and p53 from hooking up, prompting senescent cells to commit suicide. But it spared healthy cells. The researchers then injected the molecule into mutant mice that age rapidly. These rodents live about half as long as normal mice, and when they are only a few months old, their fur starts to fall out, their kidneys begin to falter, and they become sluggish. However, the peptide boosted the density of their fur, reversed the kidney damage, and increased the amount of time they could scurry in a running wheel, the scientists report online today in Cell. When the researchers tested the molecule in normal, elderly mice, they saw a similar picture: In addition to helping their kidneys and fur, the molecule also increased their willingness to explore their surroundings.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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