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BBC Censoring Open Source

Why did the BBC just censor the phrase "open source" from the following article?

(Significant differences highlighted in red)

Take 1:

When Microsoft Attacks

Slated employs many different techniques to protect the site from hacking, but by far the most important is vigilance, and that means paying close attention to things like logs.

Like many sites, Slated is under constant attack, mostly from bots running on compromised Windows machines, but most of those attacks are purely opportunistic and random, or in other words aren't actually targeting Slated for any particular reason. But every now and then I discover something in the server logs that suggests otherwise.

Today was one of those days.

Dennis Ritchie: A Tribute to a Great Man

Dennis Ritchie

Dennis Ritchie, 1941-2011: Father of the C programming language, and co-creator of Unix.

Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie, creator of the C programming language and co-author of the famous book by the same name (a.k.a. ‘the K&R book’), much loved and respected by C programmers the world over, sadly passed away last weekend.

Before retiring in 2007, Ritchie followed in his father's footsteps by joining Bell Labs in 1967, starting a career that spanned 40 years in the field of computer science. There he contributed to the Multics project (the forerunner of Unix) and a compiler for the BCPL language, then eventually co-created the Unix operating system with Ken Thompson. During his work on Unix, Ritchie created the C Programming Language, which is now a formal ANSI and ISO standard, and is one of the most widely used programming languages of all time, currently only equalled by James Gosling's Java in popularity.

Ritchie was jointly honoured with several awards during his lifetime, along with Ken Thompson, including the Turing Award in 1983, the Hamming Medal in 1990, the (US) National Medal of Technology in 1999 and, most recently, the Japan Prize for Information and Communications in 2011.