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Summary: BBC's Microsoft Bias

Summary of the BBC's blatant Microsoft bias and anti-Linux bigotry:

  • BBC blatantly lies about Windows Phone 7 "dominating" the smartphone market, even though it only has a 1.9% market share, compared to Symbian's 11.7% market share, which the BBC inexplicably claims must mean it's "not long for this world"
  • BBC Censoring Open Source: BBC education reporter, Judith Burns, removes the phrase "open source" from education secretary's speech
  • BBC sneers at Linux: BBC Click reporter, Microsoft evangelist and anti-Linux bigot, Spencer Kelly, refuses to name the Linux OS powering a new device at CES 2012, then sneers: "As you can see the operating system has been written especially for this tablet, because that's what I think the world needs, is yet another tablet operating system. But seriously... "
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BBC Censoring Open Source

Why did the BBC just censor the phrase "open source" from the following article?

(Significant differences highlighted in red)

Take 1:

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When Microsoft Attacks

Slated employs many different techniques to protect the site from hacking, but by far the most important is vigilance, and that means paying close attention to things like logs.

Like many sites, Slated is under constant attack, mostly from bots running on compromised Windows machines, but most of those attacks are purely opportunistic and random, or in other words aren't actually targeting Slated for any particular reason. But every now and then I discover something in the server logs that suggests otherwise.

Today was one of those days.

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Dennis Ritchie: A Tribute to a Great Man

Dennis Ritchie

Dennis Ritchie, 1941-2011: Father of the C programming language, and co-creator of Unix.

Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie, creator of the C programming language and co-author of the famous book by the same name (a.k.a. ‘the K&R book’), much loved and respected by C programmers the world over, sadly passed away last weekend.

Before retiring in 2007, Ritchie followed in his father's footsteps by joining Bell Labs in 1967, starting a career that spanned 40 years in the field of computer science. There he contributed to the Multics project (the forerunner of Unix) and a compiler for the BCPL language, then eventually co-created the Unix operating system with Ken Thompson. During his work on Unix, Ritchie created the C Programming Language, which is now a formal ANSI and ISO standard, and is one of the most widely used programming languages of all time, currently only equalled by James Gosling's Java in popularity.

Ritchie was jointly honoured with several awards during his lifetime, along with Ken Thompson, including the Turing Award in 1983, the Hamming Medal in 1990, the (US) National Medal of Technology in 1999 and, most recently, the Japan Prize for Information and Communications in 2011.

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Good Riddance Steve Jobs

iDead

Anyone reading today's headlines might be forgiven for thinking Gandhi had died ... again.

But no, it wasn't Gandhi, nor indeed anyone of even the slightest nobility. It was a patent extortionist with an apparent objection to altruism, called Steve Jobs. Even El Presidente fawned over this selfish racketeer, like he was the new messiah, or something:

Steve was among the greatest of American innovators – brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world, and talented enough to do it,’ the statement gushed.

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