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Benchmarking AMD's New AOCC Compiler For Ryzen

Phoronix - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:50pm
This week AMD released AOCC 1.0, the AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler, with initial support for Ryzen/Zen CPUs. In this article are our first benchmarks of the AOCC compiler compared to the GCC 6/7/8 and LLVM Clang 4/5 compilers.

After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:48pm
'I have a sickness,' former politician notices while facing two years in chokey

Disgraced politician Anthony Weiner has finally realized what the rest of the world has known for some time.…

CIA Co-Developed 'Athena' Windows Malware With US Cyber Security Company, WikiLeaks Reveals

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: Today, WikiLeaks leaked documentation about a tool called Athena. According to leaked documents, which WikiLeaks previously claimed it received from hackers and CIA insiders, Athena is an implant -- a CIA technical term for "malware" -- that can target and infect any Windows system, from Windows XP to Windows 10, Microsoft's latest OS version. Documents leaked today are dated between September 2015 and February 2016, showing that the CIA had the ability to hack Windows 10 months after its launch, despite Microsoft boasting about how hard it would be to hack its new OS. [...] The documents reveal that CIA had received help from a non-government contractor in developing the malware. The company is Siege Technologies, a cyber-security company based in New Hampshire, which was acquired on November 15, 2016, by Nehemiah Security, another US company, based in Tysons, Virginia, on the outskirts of Washington and near CIA's headquarters, in a zone peppered with various military and defense contractors.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Formation Data Systems? More like formatted data systems: Upstart shuts down

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:29pm
Ambitious storage startup halts after setting fire to cash

Startup Formation Data Systems has shuttered its operations, we're told. Sources familiar with the matter said it closed down on May 16.…

ARB_bindless_texture Patches Posted For RadeonSI Gallium3D

Phoronix - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:07pm
Samuel Pitoiset of Valve has posted a set of 65 patches needed for wiring in ARB_bindless_texture support inside RadeonSI Gallium3D...

'Without Action on Antibiotics, Medicine Will Return To the Dark Ages'

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 6:00pm
Four years ago professor Sally Davies, England's chief medical officer, gave the world a sombre warning of the growing threat posed by bacteria evolving resistance to life-saving antibiotics. If this were left unaddressed, she argued, it would lead to the erosion of modern medicine as we know it. Doctors and scientists had long warned of the problem, but few outside medicine were taking real heed. Consumption of antibiotics rose 36% between 2000 and 2010, writes Ed Whiting, director of policy and chief of staff at Wellcome, a biomedical research charity based in London. He notes that much of the progress in the field is yet to be made: We urgently need new antibiotics. No new classes of antibiotics have been approved since the early 1980s. Between 1940 and 1962 about 20 classes were produced, but industry backing has decreased significantly since that golden age. The pipeline of new treatments is all but dry, the void fast exploited by resistant bacteria. A concerning number are now resistant to drugs reserved as the last line of defence, and the most vulnerable are in greatest danger -- the young, old and critically ill. Blood infections caused by drug-resistant microbes kill more than 200,000 newborn babies each year. The reason for the lack of interest from the pharmaceutical industry is simple: the economics don't add up. Developing new antibiotics is scientifically challenging, time-consuming and costly. The medicines we so badly need cannot be allowed to be sold in volume; they must be conserved for real need, with fair access guaranteed. This limits their retail value. Many early-stage projects will fail, making them a risky bet. Even those that are successful will take at least a decade to produce medicines that are safe for human use.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A Tip for Apple in China: Your Hunger for Revenue May Cost You

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 5:20pm
Li Yuan, writing for the WSJ: Apple's latest predicament centers on its App Store. Last month, Apple told several Chinese social-networking apps, including the wildly popular messaging platform WeChat, to disable their "tip" functions to comply with App Store rules (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternative source), according to executives at WeChat and other companies. That function allows users to send authors and other content creators tips, from a few yuan to hundreds, via transfers from mobile-wallet accounts. Those transfers are offered by the social-networking apps free of charge, as a way to inspire user engagement. Now, those tips will be considered in-app purchases, just like buying games, music and videos, entitling Apple to a 30% cut. For Apple, which has been observing slowing growth in mature markets, China is increasingly becoming important. But the company's my way or high-way approach might hurt the company's image in China. And that image as well as fortunes of local companies, is what the Chinese authorities deeply care about. As Yuan adds, "while it's understandable that Apple wants to tap the App Store for more money, its pressure on the app platforms risks alienating powerful Chinese companies, turning off Chinese iPhone users and drawing unnecessary attention from the regulators." Executives of these IM messaging apps tell WSJ that Apple has threatened that it would kick their apps out of the App Store if they don't comply. The problem is, WeChat is way more popular in China than Apple -- or its iPhones or its services or both combined, analysts say. WeChat is insanely popular in China, and people love to use the app to pay for things they purchase and send money to friends. Apple's greed could end up resulting in millions of new Android users, analysts said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IBM is Telling Remote Workers To Get Back in the Office Or Leave

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:40pm
For the last few years, IBM has built up a remote work program for its 380,000 employees. Now the Wall Street Journal reports that IBM is "quietly dismantling" this option, and has told its employees this week that they either need to work in the office or leave the company (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternative source). From the report: IBM is giving thousands of its remote workers in the U.S. a choice this week: Abandon your home workspaces and relocate to a regional office -- or leave the company. The 105-year-old technology giant is quietly dismantling its popular decades-old remote work program to bring employees back into offices, a move it says will improve collaboration and accelerate the pace of work. The changes comes as IBM copes with 20 consecutive quarters of falling revenue and rising shareholder ire over Chief Executive Ginni Rometty's pay package. The company won't say how many of its 380,000 employees are affected by the policy change, which so far has been rolled out to its Watson division, software development, digital marketing, and design -- divisions that employ tens of thousands of workers. The shift is particularly surprising since the Armonk, N.Y., company has been among the business world's staunchest boosters of remote work, both for itself and its customers. IBM markets software and services for what it calls "the anytime, anywhere workforce," and its researchers have published numerous studies on the merits of remote work.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IBM, a Pioneer of Remote Work, Calls Workers Back to the Office

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:40pm
For the last few years, IBM has built up a remote work program for its 380,000 employees. Now the Wall Street Journal reports that IBM is "quietly dismantling" this option, and has told its employees this week that they either need to work in the office or leave the company (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternative source). From the report: IBM is giving thousands of its remote workers in the U.S. a choice this week: Abandon your home workspaces and relocate to a regional office -- or leave the company. The 105-year-old technology giant is quietly dismantling its popular decades-old remote work program to bring employees back into offices, a move it says will improve collaboration and accelerate the pace of work. The changes comes as IBM copes with 20 consecutive quarters of falling revenue and rising shareholder ire over Chief Executive Ginni Rometty's pay package. The company won't say how many of its 380,000 employees are affected by the policy change, which so far has been rolled out to its Watson division, software development, digital marketing, and design -- divisions that employ tens of thousands of workers. The shift is particularly surprising since the Armonk, N.Y., company has been among the business world's staunchest boosters of remote work, both for itself and its customers. IBM markets software and services for what it calls "the anytime, anywhere workforce," and its researchers have published numerous studies on the merits of remote work.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Comodo database glitch causes billing problems

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:36pm
Enter the snag-dragon

Updated  While the rest of the world had its eyes firmly on the WannaCrypt outbreak, digital certificate firm Comodo suffered an unrelated but protracted database problem that affected its billing systems.…

They grow up so fast! Veeam Availability Suite reaches the tenth grade

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:19pm
Now run along and play with your new friends

Veeam has issued the tenth version of its Availability Suite backup and restore product, saying it offers a wider-ranging data protection environment than ever before.…

Biz overlords need to give a stuff about what they're told by IT crowd

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:03pm
Data breaches smack bottom line, cautions survey

Companies that suffer a data breach can expect to see their share price fall by five per cent and watch two to three per cent of customers take their business elsewhere.…

Facebook and Twitter 'Harm Young People's Mental Health'

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 4:00pm
Instagram and Snapchat are really bad for young people's mental health, according to research by two health organisations. Virtually all major social media platforms have a negative impact on the well-being of 14-24-year-olds, the study adds. Instagram was the worst -- followed by Snapchat, Facebook, and Twitter. From a report on The Guardian: Instagram has the most negative impact on young people's mental wellbeing, a survey of almost 1,500 14- to 24-year-olds found, and the health groups accused it of deepening young people's feelings of inadequacy and anxiety. The survey, published on Friday, concluded that Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter are also harmful. Among the five only YouTube was judged to have a positive impact. The four platforms have a negative effect because they can exacerbate children's and young people's body image worries, and worsen bullying, sleep problems and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness, the participants said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Shogun 2 On Linux Will Work With Radeon GPUs On Mesa 17.1, NVIDIA 375+

Phoronix - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:46pm
After announcing SHOGUN 2 for Linux earlier this week, Feral Interactive has now announced the system requirements for this newest Linux game port being released next week...

Who loves tapas? Of course you do. What about storage tapas?

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:29pm
Well, here are some plates full of bite-sized news anyway

For this round-up of storage news we start with Data Gravity and Veeam, move on to a McLaren super car crash, and pass through company news, some customer wins, news snippets and on to people moves.…

Intel Working On Thunderbolt Security Levels For Linux, Firmware Updates

Phoronix - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:27pm
Intel is continuing to improve the Thunderbolt support within the Linux kernel...

French Researchers Find Last-ditch Cure To Unlock WannaCry Files

Slashdot - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:20pm
French researchers said on Friday they had found a last-chance way for technicians to save Windows files encrypted by WannaCry, racing against a deadline as the ransomware threatens to start locking up victims' computers first infected a week ago. From a report: WannaCry, which started to sweep round the globe last Friday and has infected more than 300,000 computers in 150 nations, threatens to lock out victims who have not paid a sum of $300 to $600 within one week of infection. A loose-knit team of security researchers scattered across the globe said they had collaborated to develop a workaround to unlock the encryption key for files hit in the global attack, which several independent security researchers have confirmed. The researchers warned that their solution would only work in certain conditions, namely if computers had not been rebooted since becoming infected and if victims applied the fix before WannaCry carried out its threat to lock their files permanently. Also see: Windows XP PCs Infected By WannaCry Can Be Decrypted Without Paying Ransom.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Dell kills botched BIOS update that murdered punters' PCs

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:17pm
'Call our tech support... have you tried turning it on and off again?'

Dell has finally 'fessed up about the BIOS update that borked some customers' PCs, and advised punters to do what many have tried so far without any success – contact its tech troubleshooters for resolution.…

Crooks use WannaCrypt hysteria as hook for BT-branded phishing emails

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 3:03pm
Confusingly, ISPs are also sending out genuine warnings

Scoundrels have latched on to the WannaCrypt outbreak as a theme for scam emails. Coincidentally some consumers are receiving seemingly genuine warnings from their ISPs related to suspected infection during last week's worldwide ransomware outbreak.…

Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

El Reg - Fri, 19/05/2017 - 2:44pm
All F-35Bs for the Navy – but, oddly, isn't set in stone

The UK will buy a grand total of 17 F-35B fighter jets between 2020 and 2022 – and acquiring the A model of the supersonic stealth fighter hasn’t been ruled out.…