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Mesa 17.1.10 Is Being Prepped As The Final 17.1 Update

Phoronix - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:34am
J.A. Suarez Romero of Igalia is preparing Mesa 17.1.10 as the final point release for the Mesa 17.1 release stream...

IT plonker stuffed 'destructive' logic bomb into US Army servers in contract revenge attack

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:34am
He's now facing 10 years in prison for act of spite

An IT contractor is facing a possible decade behind bars in America for planting a ticking "destructive" time bomb in US military systems.…

Ford Is Using Microsoft's HoloLens To Design Cars In Augmented Reality

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:05am
Ford is using Microsoft's HoloLens headset to let designers quickly model out changes to cars, trucks, and SUVs in augmented reality. This allows designers to see the changes on top of an existing physical vehicle, instead of the traditional clay model approach to car design. The Verge reports: Ford is still using clay models, but the HoloLens can be used to augment additional 3D models without having to build every single design prototype with clay. It's one of the more interesting ways we've seen businesses use Microsoft's HoloLens, and it's something customers will never see. Microsoft is planning to hold a Windows Mixed Reality launch event on October 3rd in San Francisco. We're not expecting to hear about a HoloLens successor, but we should get a better idea of what apps and games we'll see coming for Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Crap cracked fat-attack Pact app chaps slapped in pact backtrack infract

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 11:30pm
US watchdog raps breach-of-contract brats for retracted transacts

Defunct mobile app company Pact broke its pact with customers to pay them promised cash incentives, US trade watchdog the FTC said on Thursday.…

DC Court Rules Tracking Phones Without a Warrant Is Unconstitutional

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 11:20pm
An anonymous reader writes: Law enforcement use of one tracking tool, the cell-site simulator, to track a suspect's phone without a warrant violates the Constitution, the D.C. Court of Appeals said Thursday in a landmark ruling for privacy and Fourth Amendment rights as they pertain to policing tactics. The ruling could have broad implications for law enforcement's use of cell-site simulators, which local police and federal agencies can use to mimic a cell phone tower to the phone connect to the device instead of its regular network. In a decision that reversed the decision of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and overturned the conviction of a robbery and sexual assault suspect, the D.C. Court of Appeals determined the use of the cell-site simulator "to locate a person through his or her cellphone invades the person's actual, legitimate and reasonable expectation of privacy in his or her location information and is a search."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cloudflare coughs up a few grand for prior-art torpedoes to sink troll

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 11:14pm
DDoS blocker well on its way to nuking Blackbird Tech in patent showdown

Cloudflare says its efforts to wipe out a patent troll using prior art have already yielded more than a dozen examples.…

EU Paid For Report That Said Piracy Isn't Harmful -- And Tried To Hide Findings

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 10:40pm
According to Julia Reda's blog, the only Pirate in the EU Parliament, the European Commission in 2014 paid the Dutch consulting firm Ecorys 360,000 euros (about $428,000) to research the effect piracy had on sales of copyrighted content. The final report was finished in May 2015, but was never published because the report concluded that piracy isn't harmful. The Next Web reports: The 300-page report seems to suggest that there's no evidence that supports the idea that piracy has a negative effect on sales of copyrighted content (with some exceptions for recently released blockbusters). The report states: "In general, the results do not show robust statistical evidence of displacement of sales by online copyright infringements. That does not necessarily mean that piracy has no effect but only that the statistical analysis does not prove with sufficient reliability that there is an effect. An exception is the displacement of recent top films. The results show a displacement rate of 40 per cent which means that for every ten recent top films watched illegally, four fewer films are consumed legally." On her blog, Julia Reda says that a report like this is fundamental to discussions about copyright policies -- where the general assumption is usually that piracy has a negative effect on rightsholders' revenues. She also criticizes the Commissions reluctance to publish the report and says it probably wouldn't have released it for several more years if it wasn't for the access to documents request she filed in July. As for why the Commission hadn't published the report earlier, Reda says: "all available evidence suggests that the Commission actively chose to ignore the study except for the part that suited their agenda: In an academic article published in 2016, two European Commission officials reported a link between lost sales for blockbusters and illegal downloads of those films. They failed to disclose, however, that the study this was based on also looked at music, ebooks and games, where it found no such connection. On the contrary, in the case of video games, the study found the opposite link, indicating a positive influence of illegal game downloads on legal sales. That demonstrates that the study wasn't forgotten by the Commission altogether..."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distrustful US Allies Force Spy Agency To Back Down In Encryption Fight

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 10:00pm
schwit1 shares a report from Reuters: An international group of cryptography experts has forced the U.S. National Security Agency to back down over two data encryption techniques it wanted set as global industry standards, reflecting deep mistrust among close U.S. allies. In interviews and emails seen by Reuters, academic and industry experts from countries including Germany, Japan and Israel worried that the U.S. electronic spy agency was pushing the new techniques not because they were good encryption tools, but because it knew how to break them. The NSA has now agreed to drop all but the most powerful versions of the techniques -- those least likely to be vulnerable to hacks -- to address the concerns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Fedora 27 Beta Hit By A Second Delay

Phoronix - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 9:30pm
Last week it was decided to delay the Fedora 27 beta due to bugs while this week they've been forced to delay the release a second time...

Firefox For iOS Gets Tracking Protection, Firefox Focus For Android Gets Tabs

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 9:20pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Mozilla today released Firefox 9.0 for iOS and updated Firefox Focus for Android. The iOS browser is getting tracking protection, improved sync, and iOS 11 compatibility. The Android privacy browser is getting tabs. You can download the former from Apple's App Store and the latter from Google Play. This is the first time Firefox has offered tracking protection on iOS, and Nick Nguyen, vice president of product at Mozilla, notes that it's finally possible "thanks to changes by Apple to enable the option for 3rd party browsers." This essentially means iPhone and iPad users with Firefox and iOS 11 will have automatic ad and content blocking in Private Browsing mode, and the option to turn it on in regular browsing. This is the same feature that's available in Firefox for Android, Windows, Mac, and Linux, as well as the same ad blocking technology used in Firefox Focus for Android and iOS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Blame Canada? $5.7m IBM IT deal balloons to $185m thanks to 'an open bag of money'

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 8:59pm
With all their hockey hullabaloo, and that crazy payout too

A CA$5.7m IBM contract to update payroll systems for the Canadian government has turned into a CA$185m boondoggle for the Great White North. That's $4.62m and $150m in US currency, respectively.…

Facebook, Twitter sucked into US Senate's Russian meddling probe

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 8:44pm
Politicians want to know what happened with those fake accounts and advertising dollars

They may still view themselves as open purveyors of free speech, but increasingly social media giants are being pulled into the US Senate's investigation of Russian interference in the American presidential elections.…

Security Researchers Warn that Third-Party GO Keyboard App is Spying on Millions of Android Users

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 8:30pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Security researchers from Adguard have issued a warning that the popular GO Keyboard app is spying on users. Produced by Chinese developers GOMO Dev Team, GO Keyboard was found to be transmitting personal information about users back to remote servers, as well as "using a prohibited technique to download dangerous executable code." Adguard made the discovery while conducting research into the traffic consumption and unwanted behavior of various Android keyboards. The AdGuard for Android app makes it possible to see exactly what traffic an app is generating, and it showed that GO Keyboard was making worrying connections, making use of trackers, and sharing personal information. Adguard notes that there are two versions of the keyboard in Google Play which it claims have more than 200 million users in total.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Has science gone too far, part 97: Boffins craft code to find protesters on social networks, rate them on their violence

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 8:24pm
Image-recognition system posited as reporting tool

Mining social networks for every scrap of information about our online lives is now common practice for marketers, academics, government agencies, and so on.…

Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year

Phoronix - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 8:09pm
Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack...

Facebook Will Share Copies of Political Ads Purchased by Russian Sources With the US Congress

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 7:50pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Facebook will turn over copies of political ads purchased by Russian sources to congressional lawmakers, who are investigating the country's potential interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Initially, Facebook had only released those ads -- 3,000 of them, valued at about $100,000 -- to Robert Mueller, the former FBI director who is spearheading the government's probe into Russia's actions. Facebook had withheld those details from House and Senate leaders, citing privacy concerns. But the move drew sharp rebukes from the likes of Sen. Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, who has charged in recent days that Facebook may not have done enough to scan its systems for potential Russian influence and to ensure that such foreign purchases -- otherwise illegal under U.S. law -- don't happen again. "After an extensive legal and policy review, today we are announcing that we will also share these ads with congressional investigators," wrote Colin Stretch, the company's general counsel. "We believe it is vitally important that government authorities have the information they need to deliver to the public a full assessment of what happened in the 2016 election."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 7:30pm
Kiss your Microsoft email goodbye, for now, if you update

Apple's latest version of iOS, namely version 11, may struggle or flat-out fail to connect to Microsoft Office and Exchange mailboxes. That's a rather annoying pain for anyone working in a typical Windows-based work environment.…

Hi Facebook, Google, we think we might tax your ads instead – lots of love, Europe x

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 7:14pm
Or maybe hold money from online transactions. Either way, we're getting our damn cash

More details have emerged on the various plans being considered by European governments to force internet giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon to pay more in taxes, including a levy on internet ads and even withholding money for online transactions.…

Corporations Just Quietly Changed How the Web Works

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 6:45pm
Adrianne Jeffries, a reporter at The Outline, writes on W3C's announcement from earlier this week: The trouble with DRM is that it's sort of ineffective. It tends to make things inconvenient for people who legitimately bought a song or movie while failing to stop piracy. Some rights holders, like Ubisoft, have come around to the idea that DRM is counterproductive. Steve Jobs famously wrote about the inanity of DRM in 2007. But other rights holders, like Netflix, are doubling down. The prevailing winds at the consortium concluded that DRM is now a fact of life, and so it would be be better to at least make the experience a bit smoother for users. If the consortium didn't work with companies like Netflix, Berners-Lee wrote in a blog post, those companies would just stop delivering video over the web and force people into their own proprietary apps. The idea that the best stuff on the internet will be hidden behind walls in apps rather than accessible through any browser is the mortal fear for open web lovers; it's like replacing one library with many stores that each only carry books for one publisher. "It is important to support EME as providing a relatively safe online environment in which to watch a movie, as well as the most convenient," Berners-Lee wrote, "and one which makes it a part of the interconnected discourse of humanity." Mozilla, the nonprofit that makes the browser Firefox, similarly held its nose and cooperated on the EME standard. "It doesn't strike the correct balance between protecting individual people and protecting digital content," it said in a blog post. "The content providers require that a key part of the system be closed source, something that goes against Mozilla's fundamental approach. We very much want to see a different system. Unfortunately, Mozilla alone cannot change the industry on DRM at this point."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nothing to see here, folks, literally... Citrix mysteriously pulls NetScaler downloads

El Reg - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 6:44pm
Builds yanked offline for a week in bug riddle

Citrix has temporarily suspended its NetScaler downloads due to an unspecified, and possibly security-related, issue.…

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