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Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Leaked screenshots show next Windows kernel to be a perfect 10

El Reg - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:09am
Not since Vista has this happened

Microsoft surprised us by upping its Windows product numbering from 8.1 straight to 10, and now it appears it's planning to make an even greater leap in the version numbering of the Windows kernel itself.…

HP boss Meg Whitman shuffles exec pawns just before biz splits

El Reg - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 2:18am
CEO aims to 'minimise disruption' of PC and printer break out while rivals sneer

HP CEO Meg Whitman has outlined a management re-org to steer the business toward an eventual split into two separate Fortune 50 firms, according to an internal memo seen by El Chan.…

Judge OKs $450m deal to end ebook price-hike row. But Apple just won't let it die

El Reg - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 1:13am
Who's winning? The lawyers

A Manhattan judge has finally approved Apple's settlement in its long-running ebook price-fixing lawsuit: $400m will go to readers who paid over the odds, and $50m will go to the lawyers suing the iTunes Giant.…

Another Hint For Kryptos

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 12:44am
rastos1 writes Four years ago Jim Sanborn, the sculptor who created the wavy metal pane called Kryptos that sits in front of the CIA in Langley revealed a clue for breaking the last remaining part of the encrypted message on Kryptos. The clue was: BERLIN. But the puzzle resisted all all decryption efforts and is still unsolved. To honor the 25th anniversary of the Wall's demise and the artist's 69th birthday this year, Sanborn has decided to reveal a new clue to help solve his iconic and enigmatic artwork. It's only the second hint he's released since the sculpture was unveiled in 1990 and may finally help unlock the fourth and final section of the encrypted sculpture, which frustrated sleuths have been struggling to crack for more than two decades. The next word in the sequence is: "clock."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Mozilla's 2013 Report: Revenue Up 1% To $314M; 90% From Google

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:46pm
An anonymous reader writes Mozilla has released its annual financial report for 2013, and the numbers hint as to why the organization signed a five-year deal with Yahoo, announced by the duo on November 19. Revenue increased just 1 percent, and the organization's reliance on Google stayed flat at 90 percent. The total revenue for the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiaries in 2011 was $163 million, and it increased 90.2 percent to $311 million for 2012. Yet that growth all but disappeared last year, as the total revenue moved up less than 1 percent (0.995 percent to be more precise) to $311 million in 2013. 85 percent of Mozilla's revenue came from Google in 2011, and that figure increased to 90 percent in 2012. While the 90 percent number remained for 2013, it's still a massive proportion and shows Mozilla last year could not figure out a way to differentiate where its money comes from.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Mozilla remembers 2013. Y'know, back when it still gobbled at the Google money-trough

El Reg - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:41pm
Firefox-maker's annual report shows costs rising, sales flat

The Mozilla Foundation has released its annual financial statement for 2013, and the numbers raise important questions about Mozilla's future, now that it has ended its longstanding funding relationship with Google.…

Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:11pm
jfruh writes:Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components (abstract).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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