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HPE sharpening the axe for 5,000 heads – report

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:14am
All part of CEO Whitman's 'long-term ops and financial blueprint'

Hewlett Packard Enterprise is about to release the trap door again with 5,000 employees, or almost 10 per cent of its workforce, expected to fall through it.…

Java JDK 9 Finally Reaches General Availability

Phoronix - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:13am
Java 9 (JDK 9) has finally reached general availability! Following setbacks, Java 9 is officially available as well as Java EE 8...

The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:02am
Two other big brands, Sky and BT, also in the naughty corner

Beleaguered ISP TalkTalk has once again been named worst UK internet provider in a biannual survey of providers by consumer charity Which?…

A Set Of BFQ Improvements Ready For Testing

Phoronix - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:01am
Recently I wrote about a BFQ regression fix that should take care of a problem spotted in our recent I/O scheduler Linux 4.13 benchmarks while now that work has yielded a set of four patches working to improve this recently-merged scheduler...

A New Zealand Company Built An AI Baby That Plays the Piano

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 10:00am
pacopico writes: A New Zealand company called Soul Machines has built a disturbingly lifelike virtual baby powered by artificial intelligence software. According to a Bloomberg story, the baby has learned to read books, play the piano and draw pictures. The work is built off the research of Mark Sagar, the company's CEO, who is on a quest to mimic human consciousness in a machine. Sagar used to work at Weta creating lifelike faces for films like King Kong and Avatar and is now building these very realistic looking virtual avatars and pumping them full of code that not only handles things like speech but that also replicates the nervous system and brain function. The baby, for example, has virtual dopamine receptors that fire when it feels joy from playing the piano. What could go wrong?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Database biz MongoDB files to go public, hopes to raise a cool $100m

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:32am
Revenues are up, but NoSQL firm still burning through cash

Oracle-chaser MongoDB has filed to go public, with its accounts revealing it made a net loss of almost $90m in the year ended January 31, 2017.…

Mini-Heartbleed info leak bug strikes Apache, airborne malware, NSA algo U-turn, and more

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 9:01am
The security week in review

Roundup  As ever, it's been a doozy of a week for cybersecurity, or lack thereof. The Equifax saga just keeps giving, the SEC admitted it was thoroughly pwned, and Slack doesn't bother to sign its Linux versions. We do spoil you so, Reg readers. And that was only yesterday. Here's the rest of the week's shenanigans we didn't get round to.…

You forgot that you hired me and now you're saying it's MY fault?

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 8:03am
Just install the trial software on 1,000 PCs and I'll be on my way

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  "I'm sorry, who are you again?"…

Microsoft and Facebook's transatlantic cable completed

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 7:28am
In 2018 'MAREA' will move ads and Azure from USA to Spain at 160 terabits per second

Construction of Microsoft and Facebook's jointly-funded submarine cable has ended.…

Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 7:01am
Sysadmin hated making it look so easy, but didn't mind being a hero for saving a payroll run

On-Call  Can you feel it? The weekend's just over the horizon, so it's time for On-Call, The Register's Friday column in which we share readers' tales of literally incredible jobs that produced improbable feats of sysadminnery.…

Most Powerful Cosmic Rays Come From Galaxies Far, Far Away

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 7:00am
A new study finds the highest-energy cosmic rays to bombard Earth come from galaxies far, far away. Space.com reports: The sun emits relatively low-energy cosmic rays. However, for more than 50 years, scientists have also detected ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, ones far beyond the capability of any particle accelerator on Earth to generate. One way to discover the origins of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays is to study their directions of travel. However, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays only rarely strike Earth's atmosphere, with one hitting any given area about the size of a soccer field about once per century, the researchers said. In order to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, scientists look for the spray of electrons, photons and other particles that result when ultra-high-energy cosmic rays hit the top of Earth's atmosphere. Each of these showers contains more than 10 billion particles, which fly downward in a disk shaped like a giant plate miles wide, according to the statement. Scientists examined the sprays from ultra-high-energy cosmic rays using the largest cosmic-ray observatory yet: the Pierre Auger Observatory built in the western plains of Argentina in 2001. It consists of an array of 1,600 particle detectors deployed in a hexagonal grid over 1,160 square miles (3,000 square kilometers), an area comparable in size to Rhode Island. A connected set of telescopes is also used to see the dim fluorescent light the particles in the sprays emit at night. The researchers analyzed data collected between 2004 and 2016. During these 12 years, the scientists detected more than 30,000 ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. If ultra-high-energy cosmic rays came from the Milky Way, one might perhaps expect them to come from all across the sky, or perhaps mostly from the direction of the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center. However, the researchers saw that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays mostly came from a broad area of sky about 90 degrees away from the direction of the Milky Way's core.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Red Hat pledges patent protection for 99 per cent of FOSS-ware

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 6:29am
Company has trove of 2,000 patents and won't enforce any of them if you licence right

Red Hat says it has amassed over 2,000 patents and won't enforce them if the technologies they describe are used in properly-licensed open-source software.…

First big Privacy Shield review has ended – and yep, it's great! Just don't ask about mass spying

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 6:03am
Surprise – a thumbs up to private info flying over the Pond

The much-heralded first review of the EU‑US Privacy Shield Framework that governs the flow of personal information across the Atlantic has concluded – and would you believe it? Representatives of the EU and US think it's doing fine.…

Cloud washes Dell off perch atop storage market

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 5:26am
Backup appliance sales go off a cliff, traditional array vendors just aren't growing

Sales of purpose-built backup appliances have dropped markedly, with year-on-year dips of 16.2 per cent by revenue and 14.9 per cent by capacity, according to analyst firm IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Purpose-Built Backup Appliance Tracker for 2017's second quarter.…

NASA, wait, wait lemme put my drink down... NASA, you need to be searching for vanadium

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 5:02am
Bio-boffins urge Red Planet life search to hunt for weird metal

Scientists hoping to discover evidence of life on Mars should search for vanadium, a metallic element, according to a paper published in Astrobiology this month.…

Java SE 9 and Java EE 8 arrive, 364 days later than first planned

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 3:57am
Now that all the unpleasantness is behind us, let us code

Java SE 9 and Java EE 8 have arrived.…

Fathers Pass On Four Times As Many New Genetic Mutations As Mothers, Says Study

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 3:30am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Children inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men's DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases. Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age. The figures mean that a child born to 30-year-old parents would, on average, inherit 11 new mutations from the mother, but 45 from the father. Kari Stefansson, a researcher at the Icelandic genetics company, deCODE, which led the study, said that while new mutations led to variation in the human genome, which is necessary for evolution to happen, "they are also believed to be responsible for the majority of cases of rare diseases in childhood." In the study published in Nature, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 1,500 Icelanders and their parents and, for 225 people, at least one of their children. They found that new mutations from mothers increased by 0.37 per year of age, a quarter of the rate found in men. While the vast majority of new mutations are thought to be harmless, occasionally they can disrupt the workings of genes that are important for good health.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cisco puts UCS director on death row, to be replaced by cloudy 'Intersight'

El Reg - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 2:34am
The Borg assimilates the infrastructure-as-code message

Cisco has announced that UCS Director will ascend into the cloud as part of a new infrastructure management service named “Intersight”.…

'Dear Apple, The iPhone X and Face ID Are Orwellian and Creepy'

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 1:25am
Trent Lapinski from Hacker Noon writes an informal letter to Apple, asking "who the hell actually asked for Face ID?" and calling the iPhone X and new face-scanning security measure "Orwellian" and "creepy": For the company that famously used 1984 in its advertising to usher in a new era of personal computing, it is pretty ironic that 30+ years later they would announce technology that has the potential to eliminate global privacy. I've been waiting 10-years since the first iPhone was announced for a full-screen device that is both smaller in my hand but has a larger display and higher capacity battery. However, I do not want these features at the cost of my privacy, and the privacy of those around me. While the ease of use and user experience of Face ID is apparent, I am not questioning that, the privacy concerns are paramount in today's world of consistent security breaches. Given what we know from Wikileaks Vault7 and the CIA / NSA capabilities to hijack any iPhone, including any sensor on the phone, the very thought of handing any government a facial ID system for them to hack into is a gift the world may never be able to return. Face ID will have lasting privacy implications from 2017 moving forward, and I'm pretty sure I am not alone in not wanting to participate. The fact of the matter is the iPhone X does not need Face ID, Apple could have easily put a Touch ID sensor on the back of the phone for authentication (who doesn't place their finger on the back of their phone?). I mean imagine how cool it would be to put your finger on the Apple logo on the back of your iPhone for Touch ID? It would have been a highly marketable product feature that is equally as effective as Face ID without the escalating Orwellian privacy implications. [...] For Face ID to work, the iPhone X actively has to scan faces looking for its owner when locked. This means anyone within a several foot range of an iPhone X will get their face scanned by other people's phones and that's just creepy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla Discontinues Its Most Affordable Model S

Slashdot - Fri, 22/09/2017 - 12:45am
Tesla will be discontinuing its cheapest Model S option, the Model S 75, this Sunday. What that means is that the all-wheel-drive version -- the 75D -- will take its place as the low-end Model S sedan, currently listed at a starting price of $74,500. Engadget reports: The move to discontinue the Model S 75 was first announced by Tesla in July after it dropped the price by $5,000 a few months earlier. The removal of the model from Tesla's offerings follows its discontinuation of the Model S 60 and 60D vehicles in April, which at the time were the least expensive Model S options available. As well as streamlining its EV line and making all Model S options all-wheel-drive, knocking off the low-end Model S vehicles is also likely being done to carve out a bigger separation between the Model 3 and Model S lines. Custom orders for the Model S 75 will be taken until Sunday, September 24th and the pre-configured versions will be available for purchase until inventory runs out.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.