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Barometers In iPhones Mean More Crowdsourcing In Weather Forecasts

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 5:38pm
cryptoz (878581) writes Apple is now adding barometers to its mobile devices: both new iPhones have valuable atmospheric pressure sensors being used for HealthKit (step counting). Since many Android devices have been carrying barometers for years, scientists like Cliff Mass have been using the sensor data to improve weather forecasts. Open source data collection projects like PressureNet on Android automatically collect and send the atmospheric sensor data to researchers.

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Barometers In iPhones Mean More Crowdsourcing In Weather Forecasts

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 5:38pm
cryptoz (878581) writes Apple is now adding barometers to its mobile devices: both new iPhones have valuable atmospheric pressure sensors being used for HealthKit (step counting). Since many Android devices have been carrying barometers for years, scientists like Cliff Mass have been using the sensor data to improve weather forecasts. Open source data collection projects like PressureNet on Android automatically collect and send the atmospheric sensor data to researchers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








An Algorithm to End the Lines for Ice at Burning Man

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:56pm
Any gathering of 65,000 people in the desert is going to require some major infrastructure to maintain health and sanity. At Burning Man, some of that infrastructure is devoted to a supply chain for ice. Writes Bennett Haselton, The lines for ice bags at Burning Man could be cut from an hour long at peak times, to about five minutes, by making one small... Well, read the description below of how they do things now, and see if the same suggested change occurs to you. I'm curious whether it's the kind of idea that is more obvious to students of computer science who think algorithmically, or if it's something that could occur to anyone. Read on for the rest; Bennett's idea for better triage may bring to mind a lot of other queuing situations and ways that time spent waiting in line could be more efficiently employed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Developers, IT Still Racking Up (Mostly) High Salaries

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:15pm
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes Software development and IT remain common jobs among those in the higher brackets, although not the topmost one, according to a new study (with graph) commissioned by NPR. Among those earning between $58,000 and $72,000, IT was the sixth-most-popular job, while software developers came in tenth place. In the next bracket up (earning between $72,000 and $103,000), IT rose to third, with software development just behind in fourth place. As incomes increased another level ($103,000 to $207,000), software developers did even better, coming in second behind managers, although IT dropped off the list entirely. In the top percentile ($207,000 and above), neither software developers nor IT staff managed to place; this is a segment chiefly occupied by physicians (in first place), managers, chief executives, lawyers, and salespeople who are really good at their jobs. In other words, it seems like a good time to be in IT, provided you have a particular skillset. If those high salaries are in Silicon Valley or New York, though, they might not seem as high as half the same rate would in Omaha, or Houston, or Raleigh.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








ISPs handbagged: BLOCK knock-off sites, rules beak

El Reg - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:12pm
Historic trademark victory, but sunset clause applies to future blocks

The UK's biggest ISPs must block websites that flog knock-off goods, after a successful High Court case brought by luxury goods firm Richemonte, the first time trademark pirates have been blocked in the EU.…

NVIDIA's NVPTX Support For GCC Is Close To Being Merged

Phoronix - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 3:50pm
The NVPTX back-end code for GCC that's going to allow OpenACC 2.0 offloading support for NVIDIA GPUs with GCC is close to materializing within the mainline code-base...

Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 3:34pm
mrspoonsi writes Google has announced changes to its search engine in an attempt to curb online piracy. The company has long been criticised for enabling people to find sites to download entertainment illegally. The entertainment industry has argued that illegal sites should be "demoted" in search results. The new measures, mostly welcomed by music trade group the BPI, will instead point users towards legal alternatives such as Spotify and Google Play. Google will now list these legal services in a box at the top of the search results, as well as in a box on the right-hand side of the page. Crucially, however, these will be adverts — meaning if legal sites want to appear there, they will need to pay Google for the placement.

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Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST

El Reg - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 3:33pm
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war

The battle for the future of the human wrist entered a new phase on Monday after it was claimed that tech goliath Microsoft is planning to release its own wearable computer in the coming weeks.…

Two-timing HP snubs Scality's RING, organises object threesome

El Reg - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:57pm
Cleversafe smoothly slips into third wheel territory

It’s a laugh a minute in the object storage business. Not content with reselling Scality’s RING object storage software alongside its own StoreAll product, HP is now two-timing Scality by reselling Cleversafe’s object storage software as well. It’s best to be sure – to be sure.…

IBM reveals disappointing Q3 financial results after declining sales

L'Inq - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:55pm

Barely broke even with $18m net income


How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.