Feed aggregator

Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Even In Digital Photography Age, High Schoolers Still Flock To the Darkroom

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:45pm
v3rgEz writes: In the age of camera-equipped smart phones and inexpensive digital cameras, many high schoolers have never seen a roll of film or used an analog camera — much less developed film and paper prints in a darkroom. Among those that have, however, old school development has developed a serious cult following, with a number of high schools still finding a dedicated audience for the dark(room) arts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Researchers warn of preloaded spyware in Android handsets

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:14pm
That off-brand Chinese smartphone you bought on eBay might not be secure

Security firm G-Data is warning users about their discovery of malware shipping preinstalled on some Chinese mobile phones.…

FTC seeks DEFCON help to finger illegal robocallers

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:13pm
Plans cash-money honeypot competition in August

The Federal Trade Commission is to host a cash competition at this year's DEFCON hacking conference in Las Vegas, with the goal of building a honeypot that can lure in robocallers and allow technologists to analyze how to block them in the future.…

4K Monitors: Not Now, But Soon

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 11:04pm
An anonymous reader writes 4K monitor prices have fallen into the range where mainstream consumers are starting to consider them for work and for play. There are enough models that we can compare and contrast, and figure out which are the best of the ones available. But this report at The Wirecutter makes the case that absent a pressing need for 8.29 million pixels, you should just wait before buying one. They say, "The current version of the HDMI specification (1.4a) can only output a 4096×2160 resolution at a refresh rate of 24 Hz or 3840×2160 at 30 Hz—the latter, half that of what we're used to on TVs and monitors. Connect up a 4K monitor at 30 Hz via HDMI and you'll see choppier animations and transitions in your OS. You might also encounter some visible motion stuttering during normal use, and you'll be locked to a maximum of 30 frames per second for your games—it's playable, but not that smooth. ... Most people don't own a system that's good enough for gaming on a 4K display—at least, not at highest-quality settings. You'll be better off if you just plan to surf the Web in 4K: Nvidia cards starting in the 600 series and AMD Radeon HD 6000 and 7000-series GPUs can handle 4K, as can systems built with integrated Intel HD 4000 graphics or AMD Trinity APUs. ... There's a light on the horizon. OS support will strengthen, connection types will be able to handle 4K displays sans digital tricks, and prices will drop as more 4K displays hit the market. By then, there will even be more digital content to play on a 4K display (if gaming or multitasking isn't your thing), and 4K monitors will even start to pull in fancier display technology like Nvidia's G-Sync for even smoother digital shootouts."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Sneak peek: Microsoft's next browser (thanks, IE Developer Channel)

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 10:50pm
Devs asked to give up-and-coming features a good kicking

Taking a page from rival web-browser makers, Microsoft has launched a developer channel to give programmers an early taste of upcoming Internet Explorer features.…

Privacy Worries For 'Smart' Smoke Alarms

Slashdot - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 10:23pm
Advocatus Diaboli sends this excerpt from an article about the data collection capabilities of the Nest Protect 'smart' smoke alarms, and how they could become a privacy concern: Consider that each Protect is packed full of sensors, some of which are capable of much more than they're doing right now: From heat and light sensors to motion sensors and ultrasonic wave sensors. This simple little device could scrape an incredible amount of data about your life if Nest asked it to: From when you get home, to when you go to bed, to your daily routine, to when you cook dinner. Now imagine how a device like that would interlock with another that you keep on your wrist, like the forthcoming Android Wear. Together, they would create a seamless mesh of connectivity where every detail of what you do and where you go is recorded into a living, breathing algorithm based on your life. Neither Nest nor Google has stated any intention to turn Nest's hardware into more than it is right now. Protect is an alarm, the Thermostat is a thermostat. But as Google ramps up its vision to connect every aspect of our world, from Android Wear to its acquisition of a company that specializes in high-res, near-instantaneous satellite imagery of Earth, it's easier than ever to see why it would cough up billions for a company that has installed hundreds of thousands of Wi-Fi connected devices in the homes of Google users."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NSW budget calls for lower GST threshold on imports

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 10:15pm
Parliament axes Lotus Notes, finds cash for mobile tech for case workers and IM for emergency services

The Australian State of New South Wales' annual Budget has called for the threshold at which the nation's ten per cent goods and services tax (GST) is applied to imported goods to be lowered.…

Oracle's $5 BEEELLION acquisition zeppelin looms over Micros Systems

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 10:02pm
Report: Database giant in 'exclusive talks' with hotel and retail thingummy vendor

Database and software megafirm Oracle is mulling a multi-billion-dollar acquisition of hospitality and retail tech vendor Micros Systems.…

Unisys cozies closer to Intel, 'sunsets' proprietary processor

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 9:55pm
Software-defined fabric architectures claim another victim

Unisys is hastening the retirement of its proprietary – and geriatric – mainframe processor, beginning with 12 new ClearPath systems based on Intel Xeon processors.…

REALLY? Can 10 per cent of Aussie jobs be threatened by pirates?

El Reg - Tue, 17/06/2014 - 9:45pm
Village Roadshow boss' anti-Google rant relies on contentious data

Nearly one-in-ten Australian jobs are at risk from Google, if the co-chairman and co-CEO of Village Roadshow Australia is to be believed.…

Syndicate content