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Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australian ISPs To Introduce '3-Strike' Style Anti-piracy Scheme

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:57pm
angry tapir writes Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ready to fill out your US taxes? Cool. Got ObamaCare? Not so fast

El Reg - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:53pm
If only there were a meme to sarcastically express gratitude to the President…

Staff behind the US government's HealthCare.gov say Americans may have received bungled tax forms from the portal – and should hold off filing them.…

Apple: Fine, we admit it – MacBook Pros suffer wonky GPU crapness

El Reg - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:33pm
Give it back and we'll fix it (for free, sigh)

Faced with a class-action lawsuit, Apple has agreed to fix MacBook Pros with knackered graphics electronics free of charge.…

Why Sony Should Ditch Everything But the PlayStation

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 11:04pm
An anonymous reader writes: A couple weeks ago, we were surprised by news that Sony was spinning off its game development studio. More recently, the company has been thinking about exiting both the mobile phone market and the TV market. An opinion piece suggests Sony shouldn't stop there, focusing more on the its PlayStation division and a few other areas — and giving up on the rest. "Continuing to concentrate on phones and other products actually makes the PlayStation experience worse for most people. Take the PS4's ability to stream games to mobile devices — a killer feature needlessly limited to the PS Vita and Sony's Xperia Android line. Why can't I play Destiny on my iPad when the TV's occupied? The iOS PlayStation app, meanwhile, is a confusing mess that hasn't even been updated for the iPhone 6. These sound like minor points, but imagine what Sony could do if everyone at the company were focused on making its most important product as good as possible. As Microsoft is learning with its recent iOS and Android experiments, you have to serve the customers where they already are."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Linux clockpocalypse in 2038 is looming and there's no 'serious plan'

El Reg - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 10:43pm
Worry now, because 23 years from now will be TOO LATE

The year 2038 is still more than two decades away, but LWN.net editor and longtime Linux kernel chronicler Jon Corbet believes software developers should be thinking about that date now, particularly in the Linux world.…

US State Department Can't Get Rid of Email Hackers

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 10:21pm
An anonymous reader sends this quote from a Wall Street Journal report: Three months after the State Department confirmed hackers breached its unclassified email system, the government still hasn't been able to evict them from the network, say three people familiar with the investigation. Government officials, assisted by outside contractors and the National Security Agency, have repeatedly scanned the network and taken some systems offline. But investigators still see signs of the hackers on State Department computers, the people familiar with the matter said. Each time investigators find a hacker tool and block it, these people said, the intruders tweak it slightly to attempt to sneak past defenses. It isn't clear how much data the hackers have taken, the people said. They reaffirmed what the State Department said in November: that the hackers appear to have access only to unclassified email. Still, unclassified material can contain sensitive intelligence.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Also Hackable: Drive-Through Car Washes

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 9:38pm
PLAR writes It turns out LaserWash automatic car washes can be easily hacked via the Internet to get a free wash or to manipulate the machines that clean the cars, a security researcher has found. Billy Rios says these car washes have web interfaces with weak/default passwords which, if obtained, could allow an attacker to telnet in and use an HTTP GET request to control the machines. Rios adds that this probably isn't the only car wash brand that's vulnerable.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Rust 1.0 Alpha 2 Lands All Major API Changes

Phoronix - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 9:16pm
The second alpha release of the forthcoming Rust 1.0 is now available and it marks the landing of all major API revisions for this programming language's major milestone...

Man the HARPOONS: YOU can EASILY SLAY ad-scumware Superfish

El Reg - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 9:15pm
Cleanse your Lenovo box of root cert badness

+Updates  The US government's Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has said the Superfish ad-injecting malware installed by Lenovo on its new laptops is a "critical" threat to security.…

Rapid Test For Ebola Now Available

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 8:54pm
sciencehabit writes: The World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the first rapid diagnostic test for Ebola. The test needs no electricity, requires just a few drops of blood from a finger prick, and can return results in 15 minutes. That will be a huge help to health workers in remote areas. Current PCR-based tests require a blood sample taken by needle, secure transport of the blood to a properly equipped laboratory with trained staff, and at least several hours to return results. Depending on how far away a suspected case is from a testing laboratory, it can take more than a day to receive test results.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hellooo, NSA? The US State Department can't kick hackers out of its networks – report

El Reg - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 8:46pm
Email servers still compromised after THREE months

An attack against US State Department servers is still ongoing three months after the agency spotted miscreants inside its email system, it's reported.…

Why Hollywood Fudged the Relativity-Based Wormhole Scenes In Interstellar

Slashdot - Fri, 20/02/2015 - 8:12pm
KentuckyFC writes: When Christopher Nolan teamed up with physicist Kip Thorne of Caltech to discuss the science behind his movie Interstellar, the idea was that Thorne would bring some much-needed scientific gravitas to the all-important scenes involving travel through a wormhole. Indeed, Thorne used the equations of general relativity to calculate the various possible shapes of wormhole and how they would distort the view through it. A London-based special effects team then created footage of a far away galaxy as seen through such a wormhole. It showed the galaxy fantastically distorted as a result, just as relativity predicts. But when it came to travelling through a wormhole, Nolan was disappointed with the footage. The problem was that the view of the other side when travelling through a wormhole turns out to be visually indistinguishable from a conventional camera zoom and utterly unlike the impression Nolan wanted to portray, which was the sense of travelling through a shortcut from one part of the universe to another. So for the final cut, special effects artists had to add various animations to convey that impression. "The end result was a sequence of shots that told a story comprehensible by a general audience while resembling the wormhole's interior," admit Thorne and colleagues in a paper they have published about wormhole science in the film. In other words, they had to fudge it. Nevertheless, Thorne is adamant that the visualisations should help to inspire a new generation of students of film-making and of relativity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.