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Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:56pm
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Fedora 21 Is Looking & Working Very Well -- Best Fedora Release Yet?

Phoronix - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:50pm
While we're still likely at least months out from the official release of Fedora 21, I've been running it a lot since last month's F21 Alpha release and it's been working out very well. Fedora 21 is easily shaping up to be the best Fedora release yet and the stability/saneness of the development packages is also a charming change compared to some of the more notorious Fedora releases of the past...

Semiconductor industry capital spending to grow 11 percent in 2014

L'Inq - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:42pm

Up to $64.5bn in 2014 from $57.8bn in 2013, says Gartner


Auntie hires API firm to manage new online BBC Store

El Reg - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:37pm
Where did I put that Top Gear?

API company Apigee has been brought in to pull together all the suppliers of BBC Worldwide’s "direct-to-consumer retail platform". The software will be used as a traffic manager.…

iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 3 and OS X Yosemite live blog

L'Inq - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:23pm

Join us at 6pm UK time for all the latest from Cupertino


City council thinks what we're all thinking: 'Comcast is terrible – and NOT welcome here'

El Reg - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:19pm
Worcester makes bold, entirely pointless stand against deal

New England's second-largest city has hit out against a proposed deal that would take place should Comcast's acquisition of Time Warner Cable go through.…

Scanning Embryos For Super-Intelligent Kids Is On the Horizon

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:12pm
An anonymous reader writes: Stephen Hsu, a professor in theoretical physics at Michigan State University, has an article discussing the genetic underpinnings of intelligence, and how our understanding of it will eventually lead to smarter children. Researchers have detected genes that influence cognitive ability, but the effect of any one gene is very small — less than 1 IQ point at best. Genetically modifying such genes is unlikely to happen any time soon, but our ability to analyze an embryo's genome is becoming quick and cheap. As we isolate more and more genes that affect intelligence, this means prospective parents will soon be able to analyze a batch of zygotes and figure out which ones are likely to be the smartest. Hsu says a batch of 10 zygotes will probably have an IQ range of 15 points or more. As our understanding of intelligence genetics grows, that range will only expand. He adds, "The corresponding ethical issues are complex and deserve serious attention in what may be a relatively short interval before these capabilities become a reality."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Scanning Embryos For Super-Intelligent Kids Is On the Horizon

Slashdot - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 2:12pm
An anonymous reader writes: Stephen Hsu, a professor in theoretical physics at Michigan State University, has an article discussing the genetic underpinnings of intelligence, and how our understanding of it will eventually lead to smarter children. Researchers have detected genes that influence cognitive ability, but the effect of any one gene is very small — less than 1 IQ point at best. Genetically modifying such genes is unlikely to happen any time soon, but our ability to analyze an embryo's genome is becoming quick and cheap. As we isolate more and more genes that affect intelligence, this means prospective parents will soon be able to analyze a batch of zygotes and figure out which ones are likely to be the smartest. Hsu says a batch of 10 zygotes will probably have an IQ range of 15 points or more. As our understanding of intelligence genetics grows, that range will only expand. He adds, "The corresponding ethical issues are complex and deserve serious attention in what may be a relatively short interval before these capabilities become a reality."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.