Feed aggregator

Google Glass catches up with Android Wear with Notifications Sync

L'Inq - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:48pm

Explorers can now view all of their smartphone's notifications in the viewfinder


4 things everyone should know about technology in football

Thinq - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:43pm

We were recently invited to attend an event at SAP's headquarters in Feltham to hear about technological innovations in the world of football. Here are four key points that the event taught me.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/10/15/4-things-sap-taught-me-about-technology-football/

Roll your own Bitcoin client? Prepare to be raided

El Reg - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:43pm
Attackers exploit borked random numbers

The engineer behind the Heartbleed checker has created a tool to hunt down wallets from poorly secured transactions that leak private keys.…

Slackware Developer Not Happy With KDE5 Development

Phoronix - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:40pm
Eric Hameleers of the Slackware project isn't happy right now with how the modularized KDE Frameworks 5 with Plasma 5 development is going and for the time being will not be making "KDE5" packages for Slackware...

Lockheed Claims Breakthrough On Fusion Energy Project

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:39pm
Lockheed Martin claims it has made a significant breakthrough in the creation of nuclear fusion reactors. The company says it has proved the feasibility of building a 100MW reactor measuring only 7 feet by 10 feet. They say the design can be built and tested within a year, and they expect an operational reactor within a decade. The project is coming out of stealth mode now to seek partners within academia, government, and industry. "Lockheed sees the project as part of a comprehensive approach to solving global energy and climate change problems. Compact nuclear fusion would also produce far less waste than coal-powered plants, and future reactors could eliminate radioactive waste completely, the company said."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Microsoft fixes three zero-day security flaws in mega Patch Tuesday

L'Inq - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:21pm

Upgrade with rhythm and we won't attract the worm


Unreal Engine 4.5 Is Looking Fantastic

Phoronix - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:20pm
Epic Games released Unreal Engine 4.5 yesterday and the improvements are looking great for this Linux friendly game engine...

Microsoft left red-faced after DMCAs dished out to Windows bloggers

El Reg - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:18pm
'Tech YouTubers ... might want to stop talking about Windows'

Microsoft has sparked fury among the faithful following a DMCA takedown trawl that snared innocent Windows bloggers.…

Ancient Brits 'set wealthy man's FANCY CHARIOT on FIRE' – boffins

El Reg - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Religious ceremony or early football riots?

Archaeologists digging in Leicestershire say they have discovered the remains of a prestige-marque chariot dating from the second or third century BC, which had seemingly been torched on purpose by local inhabitants.…

OpenACC 2.0 With NVIDIA PTX/CUDA Support Is Closer For GCC

Phoronix - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 1:00pm
For the past year Code Sourcery / Mentor Graphics has been working with NVIDIA to bring OpenACC 2.0 support to GCC and to allow for this heterogeneous parallel programming API to be taken advantage of with NVIDIA GPUs from GCC. This work is closer to finally being realized for allowing OpenACC programs to be compiled with GCC and target NVIDIA GPUs on Linux...

Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:56pm
mdsolar tips news that a second healthcare worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for the Ebola virus. Like the nurse who tested positive a few days ago, this worker was involved in providing care to Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who seems to have brought the virus into the country. The CDC is working to identify further exposures to the local community, though the Times says a second infection among the 70+ medical professionals who were around Duncan is not unexpected. The largest U.S. nurses union says a lack of proper protective gear and constantly changing protocols are to blame for exposures. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization says infection rates in West Africa are such that within a few months, they can expect 10,000 new Ebola cases a week. They also say the death rate for the current outbreak has risen to 70 percent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Right To Be Forgotten in the US: Americans wanna be like EU-oo-oo, says watchdog

El Reg - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:42pm
Why can't you forget about us Yanks as well, Google asked

The US should be more like Europe – and introduce the controversial "right to be forgotten" ruling – says a top American consumer-defending organisation.…

Google Glass wearer is first to be diagnosed with Internet Addiction Disorder

L'Inq - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:34pm

Male in treatment after experiencing dreams as if through wearable's viewfinder


Logicalis: World Cup and IBM kit drop-off hit us hard in H1

El Reg - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:16pm
Services, Westcon help to rescue Datatec... sort of

Excitable Brazilian firms initiated a network spending freeze during the World that led to a $50m drop-off in kit sales for Logicalis, the integrator’s parent company Datatec said today.…

If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 12:14pm
storagedude writes: With Amazon Web Services losing an estimated $2 billion a year, it's not inconceivable that the cloud industry could go the way of storage service providers (remember them?). So any plan for cloud services must include a way to retrieve your data quickly in case your cloud service provider goes belly up without much notice (think Nirvanix). In an article at Enterprise Storage Forum, Henry Newman notes that recovering your data from the cloud quickly is a lot harder than you might think. Even if you have a dedicated OC-192 channel, it would take 11 days to move a petabyte of data – and that's with no contention or other latency. One possible solution: a failover agreement with a second cloud provider – and make sure it's legally binding.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.