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The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Man Responsible For Pop-Up Ads On Building a Better Web

Slashdot - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 12:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Above all, Ethan Zuckerman wants you to know that he is sorry. In the mid-1990s, Zuckerman was working as a designer and programmer for Tripod.com when he wrote the code for the first pop-up ad. He says: "At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad. It was a way to associate an ad with a user’s page without putting it directly on the page, which advertisers worried would imply an association between their brand and the page’s content. Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Giving your old Tesco Hudl to Auntie June? READ THIS FIRST

El Reg - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:59am
You can never wipe supermarket slab clean enough

UK supermarket Tesco’s Hudl tablet will offer up data from past users – even if it’s been factory reset.…

Premier League does not want goals shared on Vine

L'Inq - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:51am

Won't somebody think of the millions of pounds?


eBay in talks with Bitcoin firms about payments processing

El Reg - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:45am
Online bazaar's Braintree subsidiary chatting up Coinbase and others

PayPal is reportedly in talks with Bitcoin firms to integrate the e-currency into its recently acquired Braintree payments system, according to the Wall Street Journal.…

All the key trends in application development explained

Thinq - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:44am

Following the Enterprise Apps World in June it's evident that app development is evolving. In this article we look at the various development methodologie and if they're appropriate for your business.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/08/15/all-the-key-trends-in-application-development-explained/

Microsoft punts FREE Office 365 mail migration, but some are not chuffed with the idea

El Reg - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:29am
Mmm, drink from our delicious fountain o' cash, partners

Microsoft will roll out free email migration services for Office 365 punters from the start of next month as it tries to accelerate adoption.…

Festival Tech: Home away from home

L'Inq - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:10am

How to make the countryside like your living room


Pop-up ad man: SORRY we made such a 'hated tool', netizens

El Reg - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:10am
Brands bummed out by SEXY FUNTIMES

It's been said before that if all porn was removed from the internet, only one website would remain: with the url wherehasalltheporngone.com.…

A closer look at the future of the self-driving car

Thinq - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 11:01am

We attended a very interesting panel at The Churchill Club this week, where plenty of revelations were made about what to expect from the connected car.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/08/15/a-closer-look-at-the-future-of-the-self-driving-car/

CPUFreq Scaling Tests With AMD's Kaveri On Linux 3.16

Phoronix - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 10:58am
In past months on Phoronix we have done many CPUfreq tests to see the impact of the different scaling governors and with Intel hardware how the CPUfreq driver compares to Intel P-State in terms of performance and power consumption. As we haven't done such ACPI CPUfreq tests on the AMD side in a long time, here's some benchmarks using a Kaveri APU and selecting the different scaling governors during performance benchmarking.

Apple's iPhone 6 likely will be more expensive than the iPhone 5S

L'Inq - Fri, 15/08/2014 - 10:56am

Due to high cost of sapphire screen, analyst claims


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