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A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes: University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot-high, 165-foot-thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls is feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300-meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:30am
meghan elizabeth writes University of Drexel physicist Rongjia Tao has a utopian proposal to build three massive, 1,000-foot high, 165-foot thick walls around the American Midwest, in order to keep the tornadoes out. Building three unfathomably massive anti-tornado walls would count as the infrastructure project of the decade, if not the century. It would be also be exceedingly expensive. "Building such walls are feasible," Tao says. "They are much easier than constructing a skyscraper. For example, in Philadelphia, the newly completed Comcast building has about 300 meter height. The wall with similar height as the Comcast building should be much easier to be constructed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








We sat through Google's bum-numbing, battery-draining 3-hour keynote so you didn't have to

El Reg - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:22am
Lick of paint for Android, car control and more

Google I/O  Google has kicked off its annual developer conference with a three-hour keynote in which the search kingpin explained where it's taking Android next: namely, your wrist, your car, your living room, and beyond.…

NBN Co reveals THOUSAND-node FTTN trial built by Telstra

El Reg - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 12:04am
Alcatel Lucent kit will dig out the copper from Big T's brains

NBN Co has selected Telstra as the builder of a 200,000-premises pilot of fibre-to-the-node technology in order to pick the copper from its brains.…

Face up to a double life with hybrid Office 365

El Reg - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 11:59pm
Integrating Lync, SharePoint and Exchange

“Cloud first” is Microsoft’s new mantra. The vision is of businesses using Office 365, running in Microsoft’s Global data centres, for collaborating, conferencing, messaging and calendaring.…

Barnes & Noble To Spin Off Nook Media, Will Take It Public

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 11:50pm
Nate the greatest writes It looks like the recent rumors about B&N splitting up were true. Along with could-have-been-worse financial news, Barnes & Noble just announced that it's going to spin off its two-year-old ebook subsidiary into a new publicly traded company. The move won't be finalized until 2015, but when it happens the new company is expected to have both existing parts of Nook Media, including the less than successful ebook division and B&N College, which is still managing to turn a profit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Australia relaxes in-flight device use rules

El Reg - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 11:21pm
Take-off switch-off nears end-of-life

Australia is following the US in eliminating the air-flight ritual of switching off electronic devices during take-off and landing.…

Astronomers Discover Earth-Sized Diamond

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 11:06pm
ygslash (893445) writes Astronomers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory announced that they have discovered what appears to be the coolest white dwarf ever detected. The white dwarf is formerly a star similar to our own sun which, after expending all of its fuel, has cooled to less than a chilly 3000 degrees Kelvin and contracted to a size approximately the same as Earth. A white dwarf is composed mostly of carbon and oxygen, and the astronomers believe that at that temperature it would be mostly crystallized, forming something like a huge diamond.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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