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Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Cosmic Rays To Reveal the Melted Nuclear Fuel In Fukushima's Reactors

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:31pm
the_newsbeagle writes: Muons, produced when cosmic rays collide with molecules in the atmosphere, are streaming through your body as you read this. The particles pass through most matter unimpeded, however they can interact with heavy elements like uranium and plutonium. That's why engineers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant are using muon detectors to look for the melted nuclear fuel inside the plant's three melted-down reactors. By determining where muons are being diverted from their paths, the detectors create images of the blobs of fuel. That's necessary because nobody knows exactly where the radioactive gloop ended up during the meltdowns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








AMD Has A New Linux/OpenGL Driver Relationship Representative

Phoronix - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 7:26pm
Beginning next week there's going to be a new member of AMD's developer relationship group that manages the ties between the graphics driver developers and game developers. This new employee is an experienced Linux developer and will focus on Linux/OpenGL cooperation...

EU Preparing Vast Air Passenger Database

Slashdot - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 6:48pm
jfruh writes: Despite privacy concerns and doubts over its usefulness, a plan to track passengers entering or leaving the European Union in a series of national databases is likely to become reality by the end of the year. Legislation working its way through the European Parliament will authorize European nations to set up databases of the sort already in use in the UK, and to share information with each other. All the EU parties except the Greens are in favor.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Acer: We're still a thing! We're still alive. And we are touting 300M shares

El Reg - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 6:30pm
Did someone say we make only PCs? Not for much longer

Acer wants to become a "hardware + software + services" biz – and issued 300 million shares on the Taiwanese Stock Exchange to fund this strategy and pay down debts.…

IBM tells channel types 'stick with us, you'll be millionaires'

El Reg - Fri, 13/02/2015 - 6:16pm
But only if you sell what we tell you to - now sing with us, cloud, analytics, mobile...

IBM is going through massive changes to shift its business towards the cloud. It desperately needs channel partners to come along for the ride, so this week threw out a bunch of initiatives that it reckons will help.…

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