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The Largest Kuiper Belt Object Isn't Pluto Or Eris, But Triton

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 9:36pm
StartsWithABang writes: Out beyond Neptune, the last of our Solar System's gas giants, the icy graveyard of failed planetesimals lurks: the Kuiper Belt. Among these mixes of ice, snow, dust and rock are a number of worlds — possibly a few hundred — massive enough to pull themselves into hydrostatic equilibrium. The most famous among them are Pluto, the first one ever discovered, and Eris, of comparable size but undoubtedly more massive. But there's an even larger, more massive object from the Kuiper Belt than either of these, yet you never hear about it: it's Triton, the largest moon of Neptune, a true Kuiper Belt object!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Largest Kuiper Belt Object Isn't Pluto Or Eris, But Triton

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 9:36pm
StartsWithABang writes: Out beyond Neptune, the last of our Solar System's gas giants, the icy graveyard of failed planetesimals lurks: the Kuiper Belt. Among these mixes of ice, snow, dust and rock are a number of worlds — possibly a few hundred — massive enough to pull themselves into hydrostatic equilibrium. The most famous among them are Pluto, the first one ever discovered, and Eris, of comparable size but undoubtedly more massive. But there's an even larger, more massive object from the Kuiper Belt than either of these, yet you never hear about it: it's Triton, the largest moon of Neptune, a true Kuiper Belt object!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Largest Kuiper Belt Object Isn't Pluto Or Eris, But Triton

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 9:36pm
StartsWithABang writes: Out beyond Neptune, the last of our Solar System's gas giants, the icy graveyard of failed planetesimals lurks: the Kuiper Belt. Among these mixes of ice, snow, dust and rock are a number of worlds — possibly a few hundred — massive enough to pull themselves into hydrostatic equilibrium. The most famous among them are Pluto, the first one ever discovered, and Eris, of comparable size but undoubtedly more massive. But there's an even larger, more massive object from the Kuiper Belt than either of these, yet you never hear about it: it's Triton, the largest moon of Neptune, a true Kuiper Belt object!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New NXP SoC Gives Android Its Apple Pay

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 8:54pm
dkatana writes: NXP, having worked with Apple on Apple Pay, is now launching its PN66T module for secure NFC mobile transactions — for Android. It's intended to implement the same functionality of Apple Pay. While NXP claims the module is OS independent, the features clearly indicate that Android devices are the likely recipients of the SoC. The PN66T is Europay, MasterCard, and Visa (EMVCo) certified, and also supports American Express ExpressPay, thus fully covering the three big credit card companies, ensuring compatibility and interoperability with existing and future payment methods.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New tool SILENCES dull chums you can't really unfriend on Facebook

El Reg - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 8:22pm
For when you can't ditch your best mate, but get sick of all those baby photos

Facebook will soon let people edit and block stuff from appearing in their News Feeds after users complained of being bombarded with boring posts.…

Blizzard Announces Overwatch, a First-Person Shooter

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 8:10pm
Today at Blizzcon, Blizzard announced its first new franchise in 17 years: Overwatch. It's a first-person shooter, a type of game Blizzard hasn't made before. It seems to be based on team deathmatch combat, with a number of characters/classes that all have different abilities. The beta test will start sometime in 2015 (you can sign-up here at the official site, unless it gets crushed by traffic). Game director Jeffrey Kaplan (a.k.a. Tigole) said one of their big goals is to make it an approachable game in a way shooters often aren't. A cinematic trailer is available, as is a gameplay trailer. Blizzard has set up stations for players at Blizzcon to play Overwatch this weekend, so more details will be coming soon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








FreeBSD Might Get A Linux Kernel API Wrapper To Help Porting Linux Drivers

Phoronix - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 7:58pm
In a discussion about porting the modern Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver to FreeBSD, it was brought up that a FreeBSD developer is looking at the possibility of introducing a Linux kernel API wrapper to help in porting Linux drivers to FreeBSD...

Mystery Google barges TORPEDOED by US govt: Showrooms declared death traps

El Reg - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 7:43pm
EXPLOSION fears scuttle plans for floating wow-boxes

Google's ambitious plan to build floating showrooms out of giant barges was killed over fears the boats were death traps.…

Zuckerberg: Most of Facebook Will Be Video Within Five Years

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 7:26pm
jfruh writes: Facebook recently held its first ever town-hall meeting in which Mark Zuckerberg took questions from the general public, and one of his answers might raise some eyebrows. When asked if the increasing numbers of photos being uploaded might strain the company's servers, he said the infrastructure is more than up to the task, because they're preparing for the notion that "in five years, most of [Facebook] will be video."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








EU cyber-cop: Dark-net crooks think they're beyond reach (until now)

El Reg - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 7:15pm
G-men all smiles after this week's raid on Tor hidden servers

Hundreds of websites shut down, 17 arrested and $1m in Bitcoin seized – Thursday was, apparently, a busy day for the West's cyber-cops.…

Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

Slashdot - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 6:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: In a new paper published in Science, researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute note that "there are reasons to believe that current approaches [to discovering life] may indeed miss taxa, particularly if they are very different from those that have so far been characterized." They believe life forms exist that don't fall into the established eukaryota, archaea, or bacteria kingdoms. They argue that there may be life out there that doesn't use the four DNA and RNA bases that we're used to; there may be life out there that has evolved completely separately from everything that we have ever known to exist; there may be life that lives in places we haven't even looked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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