Feed aggregator

WHY did <i>Sunday Mirror</i> stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?

El Reg - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 11:37am
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here

Too cheap or perhaps simply not bothered enough to manufacture its own selfies, the Sunday Mirror newspaper stole photos to entrap a Tory MP on Twitter. Now the owners of the photos might get the last laugh.…

Create IoT devices with SAM Labs' development kit without coding skills

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 11:23am

The Kickstarter project is live


Internet of Stuff: Chip rivals try to stop Cortex-M7 from flexing ARM’s muscle

El Reg - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 11:17am
Processors, microcontrollers start to collide

The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing an estimated five times more quickly than the overall embedded processing market, so it's no wonder chip suppliers are flocking to fit out connected cars, home gateways, wearables and streetlights as quickly as they can.…

Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October

El Reg - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 11:03am
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?

Lenovo will finally get to close the deal on IBM’s x86 server division on 1 October – after slicing a few hundred million off the price tag.…

As UK government braces for employment crisis, one startup thinks it has the solution

Thinq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 11:00am

As the government begins the long brainstorming process into finding defense from the looming digital skills gap, one educational games developer think they've already found the solution.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/09/29/government-braces-employment-crisis-one-startup-thinks-it-has-solution/

BT Cloud Voice looks to modernise SMBs with internet calls

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 10:58am

Claims its time to ditch the traditional telephone


Lenovo buyout of IBM's x86 server business to close within hours

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 10:37am

Eight months and a lot of scrutiny later


EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report

El Reg - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 10:36am
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful

The European Commission is set to accuse Apple of profiting from unlawful state aid from Ireland thanks to the sweet tax deals the firm has enjoyed for the last 20 years, a newspaper has reported.…

Facebook's Atlas ad-tracking service follows users across devices

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 10:13am

Advertising just got creepier


Chip titan Micron shows off Elpida-fattened bottom line

El Reg - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 10:03am
Slurped Rexchip too...

US semiconductor chipper Micron has boosted its memory and flash business revenues with its purchase of Rexchip and Elpida, announcing record fourth quarter and fiscal 2014 year revenues.…

Satya Nadella chats competition with Chinese watchdog

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:41am

State Administration for Industry and Commerce gets its man


Apple could be fined 'billions' over alleged dodgy Irish tax deals

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:24am

But firm maintains it has done nothing wrong


iPhone and iPad users report iOS 8.0.2 connectivity, Safari glitches

L'Inq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:09am

Update appears to do more harm than good


Why technology is redefining Hong Kong's Occupy protests

Thinq - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am

Thousands of protesters have flooded into the heart of central Hong Kong over recent days to demonstrate against the Beijing government. Let’s look at the ways technology has defined #OccupyHongKong.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2014/09/29/3-ways-technology-has-changed-the-face-of-occupy-hong-kong/

Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Multimedia-Based Wiki For Learning and Business Procedures?

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 9:06am
kyle11 writes I'm scratching my head at how to develop a decent wiki for a large organization I work in. We support multiple technologies, across multiple locations, and have ways of doing things that become exponentially convoluted. I give IT training to many of these users for a particular technology, and other people do for other stuff as well. Now, I hate wikis because everyone who did one before failed and gave them a bad name. If it starts wrong, it is doomed to failure and irrelevance. What I'm looking for would be something like a Wiki with YouTube built in — make a playlist of videos with embedded links for certain job based tasks. And reuse and recycle those videos in other playlists of other tasks as they may be applicable. It would go beyond the actual IT we work with and would include things like, "Welcome to working in this department. Here are 20 videos detailing stupid procedures you need to go through to request access to customers' systems/networks/databases to even think about doing your job." I tried MediaWiki and Xwiki, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I can't seem to find a way to tweak them to YouTube-level simplicity for anyone to contribute to without giving up on the thing because its' a pain in the butt. My only real requirement is that it not be cloud-based because it will contain certain sensitive information and I'd like it all to live on one virtual machine if at all possible. I can't be the only one with this problem of enabling many people to contribute and sort their knowledge without knowing how an HTML tag works, or copying files into something more complicated than a web browser. What approaches have any of you out there taken to trying to solve a similar problem?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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