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Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole. Update: 06/26 00:42 GMT by T : (Get the story straight from the source: Here's the original report from DUO.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Trivial Bypass of PayPal Two-Factor Authentication On Mobile Devices

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:41pm
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "According to DUO, PayPal's mobile app doesn't yet support Security Key and displays an error message to users with the feature enabled when they try to log in to their PayPal account from a mobile device, terminating their session automatically. However, researchers at DUO noticed that the PayPal iOS application would briefly display a user's account information and transaction history prior to displaying that error message and logging them out. ... The DUO researchers investigated: intercepting and analyzing the Web transaction between the PayPal mobile application and PayPal's back end servers and scrutinizing how sessions for two-factor-enabled accounts versus non-two-factor-enabled accounts were handled. They discovered that the API uses the OAuth technology for user authentication and authorization, but that PayPal only enforces the two-factor requirement on the client — not on the server." The attack worked simply by intercepting a server response and toggling a flag (2fa_enabled) from true to false. After being alerted, PayPal added a workaround to limit the scope of the hole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Mobile SIM chip-makers 'will be fined by EU' for price-fixing, say sources

El Reg - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:26pm
EU regulators could sting them for 10% of global revenues

EU antitrust regulators are set to fine Samsung, Philips, Infineon Technologies and other tech firms for fixing the prices of chips used in mobile SIM cards, familiar folks whispered to Reuters.…

Google I/O 2014 Begins [updated]

Slashdot - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 4:00pm
Google I/O, the company's annual developer tracking^wdevelopers conference, has opened today in San Francisco. This year the company has reduced the number of conference sessions to 80, but also promised a broader approach than in previous years -- in other words, there may be a shift in focus a bit from Google's best known platforms (Chrome/Chrome OS and Android). Given its wide-ranging acquisitions and projects (like the recent purchase of Nest, which itself promptly bought Dropcam, the ever smarter fleet of self-driving cars, the growing number of Glass devices in the wild, and the announcement of a 3D scanning high end tablet quite unlike the Nexus line of tablets and phones), there's no shortage of edges to focus on. Judging from the booths set up in advance of the opening (like one with a sign announcing "The Physical Web," expect some of the stuff that gets lumped into "the Internet of Things." Watch this space -- updates will appear below -- for notes from the opening keynote, or follow along yourself with the live stream, and add your own commentary in the comments. In the days to come, watch for some video highlights of projects on display at I/O, too. Update: 06/25 17:41 GMT by T : Updates rolling in below on Android, wearables, Android in cars, Chromecast, smart watches, etc.Keep checking back! (Every few minutes, I get another chunk in there.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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