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Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Pop open this iPhone 6 and see where the magic oozes from ... oh hello again, Qualcomm

El Reg - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 9:05pm
New speaking slabs blown to smithereens

Teardown  Apple's new iPhones have been torn apart to reveal their innards – and we're told if you're prone to lobbing your new handset at the ground, there's a good chance it's repairable.…

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