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Experts Say Hitching a Ride In an Airliner's Wheel Well Is Not a Good Idea

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:53am
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Hasani Gittens reports that as miraculous as it was that a 16-year-old California boy was able to hitch a ride from San Jose to Hawaii and survive, it isn't the first time a wheel-well stowaway has lived to tell about it. The FAA says that since 1947 there have been 105 people who have tried to surreptitiously travel in plane landing gear — with a survival rate of about 25 percent. But agency adds that the actual numbers are probably higher, as some survivors may have escaped unnoticed, and bodies could fall into the ocean undetected. Except for the occasional happy ending, hiding in the landing gear of a aircraft as it soars miles above the Earth is generally a losing proposition. According to an FAA/Wright State University study titled 'Survival at High Altitudes: Wheel-Well Passengers,' at 20,000 feet the temperature experienced by a stowaway would be -13 F, at 30,000 it would be -45 in the wheel well — and at 40,000 feet, the mercury plunges to a deadly -85 F (PDF). 'You're dealing with an incredibly harsh environment,' says aviation and security expert Anthony Roman. 'Temperatures can reach -50 F, and oxygen levels there are barely sustainable for life.' Even if a strong-bodied individual is lucky enough to stand the cold and the lack of oxygen, there's still the issue of falling out of the plane. 'It's almost impossible not to get thrown out when the gear opens,' says Roman. So how do the lucky one-in-four survive? The answer, surprisingly, is that a few factors of human physiology are at play: As the aircraft climbs, the body enters a state of hypoxia—that is, it lacks oxygen—and the person passes out. At the same time, the frigid temperatures cause a state of hypothermia, which preserves the nervous system. 'It's similar to a young kid who falls to the bottom of an icy lake," says Roman. "and two hours later he survives, because he was so cold.'"

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Experts Say Hitching a Ride In an Airliner's Wheel Well Is Not a Good Idea

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:53am
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Hasani Gittens reports that as miraculous as it was that a 16-year-old California boy was able to hitch a ride from San Jose to Hawaii and survive, it isn't the first time a wheel-well stowaway has lived to tell about it. The FAA says that since 1947 there have been 105 people who have tried to surreptitiously travel in plane landing gear — with a survival rate of about 25 percent. But agency adds that the actual numbers are probably higher, as some survivors may have escaped unnoticed, and bodies could fall into the ocean undetected. Except for the occasional happy ending, hiding in the landing gear of a aircraft as it soars miles above the Earth is generally a losing proposition. According to an FAA/Wright State University study titled 'Survival at High Altitudes: Wheel-Well Passengers,' at 20,000 feet the temperature experienced by a stowaway would be -13 F, at 30,000 it would be -45 in the wheel well — and at 40,000 feet, the mercury plunges to a deadly -85 F (PDF). 'You're dealing with an incredibly harsh environment,' says aviation and security expert Anthony Roman. 'Temperatures can reach -50 F, and oxygen levels there are barely sustainable for life.' Even if a strong-bodied individual is lucky enough to stand the cold and the lack of oxygen, there's still the issue of falling out of the plane. 'It's almost impossible not to get thrown out when the gear opens,' says Roman. So how do the lucky one-in-four survive? The answer, surprisingly, is that a few factors of human physiology are at play: As the aircraft climbs, the body enters a state of hypoxia—that is, it lacks oxygen—and the person passes out. At the same time, the frigid temperatures cause a state of hypothermia, which preserves the nervous system. 'It's similar to a young kid who falls to the bottom of an icy lake," says Roman. "and two hours later he survives, because he was so cold.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








HTC mulls swoop for Nokia's MASSIVE Chennai plant

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:40am
Assembly line would boost mobe maker's Indian push

HTC could be in the market for Nokia’s troubled Chennai manufacturing plant in India – as the chances of a smooth transfer of the factory to Microsoft are increasingly remote.…

Sleuths find nosy NORKS drones on the Chinternet

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:20am
UAVs likely to have been made in the Middle Kingdom

At least one of the suspected North Korean drones found after crashing south of the 38th parallel appears to have been made by a Chinese aviation company.…

Google to refund buyers of 'fake' anti-virus app

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:02am
Here's a little chocolate...

Google has decided that a smallish (for The Chocolate Factory) wad of cash is a trivial price to pay for maintaining its reputation, and has begun refunding punters who fell for the fake “virus shield” scam.…

Clang Fights GCC On AMD's Athlon AM1 APU With Jaguar Cores

Phoronix - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 6:00am
A few days ago I did my latest benchmarks of GCC vs. LLVM/Clang and that was using an Intel Core i7 4770K "Haswell" processor. The tables have now turned and in this article are GCC vs. LLVM Clang benchmarks of the AMD Athlon 5350 APU with four Jaguar CPU cores.

<i>Reg</i> man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 5:02am
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers

Feature  Reg reader Ben Lamb was so impressed with how his recent Lightwave RF installation turned out, he put pinkie to keyboard to share his experiences with us. In his own words, here's how he got on.

Our Education System Is Failing IT

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 4:04am
Nemo the Magnificent (2786867) writes "In this guy's opinion most IT workers can't think critically. They are incapable of diagnosing a problem, developing a possible solution, and implementing it. They also have little fundamental understanding of the businesses their employers are in, which is starting to get limiting as silos are collapsing within some corporations and IT workers are being called upon to participate in broader aspects of the business. Is that what you see where you are?"

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Boffins brew graphene in kitchen blender

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 4:01am
Will it blend? You bet

Take pencil leads, detergent, water, stick them in a high-power kitchen blender, and the result? A brew containing the wonder-stuff graphene.…

D-Link DCS-2330L HD Wireless Network Camera

Phoronix - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 4:00am
For those in need of an outdoor-ready HD wireless network camera for added security for your home but that isn't dependent upon any Windows (or non-Linux-compatible) application software for viewing and managing the device, meet the D-Link DCS-2330L.

WiLAN files appeal in Apple WiFi case

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 3:01am
Back from under the bridge

WiLAN, which last October lost a patent case against Apple that had been settled by companies like Dell, HP and Alcatel-Lucent, has decided to appeal the case.…

NBN Co to government: 'unchain us'

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:32am
One-way competition isn't competition

NBN Co has asked the government to release it from restrictions it says constrain its ability to compete with other carriers seeking to cherry-pick lucrative markets.…

The Science Behind Powdered Alcohol

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:10am
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Last week, the US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved Palcohol, a powdered alcohol product that you can either use to turn water into a presumably not-that-delicious marg or to snort if you don't care too much about your brain cells. It's the first time a powdered alcohol product has been approved for sale in the US, but not the first time someone has devised one, and such products have been available in parts of Europe for a few years now. Now you may be wondering, as I was, how the heck do you go about powdering alcohol? As you might expect, there's quite a bit of chemistry involved, but the process doesn't seem overly difficult; we've known how to do it since the early 1970s, when researchers at the General Foods Corporation (now a subsidiary of Kraft) applied for a patent for an 'alcohol-containing powder.'" It turns out the labels were issued in error, so don't expect it to be available soon. But it does appear to be a real thing that someone is trying to have approved.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


The Science Behind Powdered Alcohol

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:10am
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Last week, the US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved Palcohol, a powdered alcohol product that you can either use to turn water into a presumably not-that-delicious marg or to snort if you don't care too much about your brain cells. It's the first time a powdered alcohol product has been approved for sale in the US, but not the first time someone has devised one, and such products have been available in parts of Europe for a few years now. Now you may be wondering, as I was, how the heck do you go about powdering alcohol? As you might expect, there's quite a bit of chemistry involved, but the process doesn't seem overly difficult; we've known how to do it since the early 1970s, when researchers at the General Foods Corporation (now a subsidiary of Kraft) applied for a patent for an 'alcohol-containing powder.'" It turns out the labels were issued in error, so don't expect it to be available soon. But it does appear to be a real thing that someone is trying to have approved.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google boffins beat own Captchas

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:02am
The StreetView numbers game

A group of Google scientists working on extracting numbers from StreetView images has discovered that their technology can also match humans at solving captchas.…

Rejoice, Russians! The annexation of Crimea is complete and legitimate – Google Maps proves it

El Reg - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:38am
Ukrainians and everyone else ... ssssh!

Google appears to have sided with Vladimir Putin in the current sovereignty dispute over the Crimean Peninsula – at least as far as residents of Russia are concerned.…

Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:10am
New submitter janoc (699997) writes about a backdoor that was fixed (only not). "Eloi Vanderbeken from Synacktiv has identified an intentional backdoor in a module by Sercomm used by major router manufacturers (Cisco, Linksys, Netgear, etc.). The backdoor was ostensibly fixed — by obfuscating it and making it harder to access. The original report (PDF). And yeah, there is an exploit available ..." Rather than actually closing the backdoor, they just altered it so that the service was not enabled until you knocked the portal with a specially crafted Ethernet packet. Quoting Ars Technica: "The nature of the change, which leverages the same code as was used in the old firmware to provide administrative access over the concealed port, suggests that the backdoor is an intentional feature of the firmware ... Because of the format of the packets—raw Ethernet packets, not Internet Protocol packets—they would need to be sent from within the local wireless LAN, or from the Internet service provider’s equipment. But they could be sent out from an ISP as a broadcast, essentially re-opening the backdoor on any customer’s router that had been patched."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Netflix speaks out against Comcast–Time Warner megadeal

El Reg - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 11:53pm
'Oh, and by the way, we're raising our fees as well'

Video service Netflix has officially come out in opposition of a potential merger between Comcast and Time Warner.…

NVIDIA Will Soon Probably Introduce OpenCL 1.2 Linux Support

Phoronix - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 11:50pm
It looks like NVIDIA is finally preparing to support OpenCL 1.2 within their NVIDIA Linux graphics driver...

Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied On a Whole City

Slashdot - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 11:33pm
Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) writes with some concerning news from the Atlantic. From the article: "In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a civilian aircraft over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. Compton residents weren't told about the spying, which happened in 2012. 'We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people,' Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he's trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren't watching in real time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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