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GCHQ splashes out £200,000 to find the next Alan Turing

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 12:44pm

Hopes to train computer science students to be the next UK cyber defenders


Microsoft to Android OEMs: 'Show me the money'

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 12:39pm
Redmond carefully considers OIN approach

Exclusive  Microsoft has reserved the right to nail firms making Android devices running its Office suit for possible Windows patent infringements.…

IBM and Apple cosy up further with more joint cloud apps

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 12:23pm

If you think they're still rivals, you're probably wearing DayGlo legwarmers


End in sight for Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe wage-fixing lawsuit

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 12:22pm
Judge seems happy with $415m offer

An end to the four-year legal battle against Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe for alleged wage-fixing is in sight, with a judge having set a final hearing date for the proposed $415m (£270m) settlement.…

BlackBerry gets flirty with QWERTY IP, launches $275 Leap

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 12:03pm
Everything is up for licensing, too

MWC 2015  BlackBerry's CEO told The Register today that everything in the company’s IP portfolio is up for grabs, including hardware IP for BlackBerry’s hallmark QWERTY keyboards.…

SanDisk launches 200GB microSD card

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:32am
Little big memory has impressive crown jewels

MWC 2015  The new SanDisk 200GB microSD card costs $399, making it more valuable weight-for-weight than blue sapphire.…

Galaxy S6 Edge review: Hands-on

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:21am

We check out Samsung's latest smartphone at MWC


Internet of Things? Pah! Biz bods, you're wasting your money

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:05am
Roaming much more important (says roaming service firm)

Mobile operators could be pissing away $46bn in their excitement over the Internet of Things and wearables.…

Twitter gets terror threats from Islamic State, calls in law enforcement

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:56am

Social network deals with virtual war fallout


MWC: LG G Watch Urbane hands-on review

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:51am

Premium Android Wear smartwatch fails to stand out from the crowd


HP will splash out $3bn for Aruba Networks, wants better IoT and WiFi

L'Inq - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:45am

Firm spends big despite recent financial blips


Microsoft opens kimono on Windows 10 Universal App Platform

El Reg - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:37am
One app to rule them all. It hopes

MWC 2015  Microsoft's Windows 10 Universal App Platform has been explained in detail for the first time, at a developer event in Barcelona as part of Mobile World Congress.…

Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:09am
An anonymous reader writes: Although Google announced in September 2014 that Android 5.0 Lollipop would require full-disk encryption by default in new cell phones, Ars Technica has found otherwise in recently-released 2nd-gen Moto E and Galaxy S6. It turns out, according to the latest version of the Android Compatibility Definition document (PDF), full-disk encryption is currently only "very strongly recommended" in anticipation of mandatory encryption requirements in the future. The moral of the story is: don't be lazy — check that your full-disk encryption is actually enabled.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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